Chassis

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Drive 2-1

Wheels 2-5

Handlebar Throttle Control 2-15

Frame 2-17

Forks 2-19

Brakes 2-33

Seat 2-39

Tools 243

DRIVE

Figure 2-1. Adjusting Front Chain Figure 2-2. Adjusting Rear Chain

CHAINS

GENERAL

Chain adjustment must be checked at regular intervals of 1250 miles. As chains stretch and wear, they run tighter at one spot than another. Always adjust free movement at tightest spot in chain to allow specified play midway between sprockets. Do not adjust tighter. Running chains too tight will result in excessive wear.

Inspect chains frequently for cracked, broken, or badly worn links. The rear chain may be taken apart for replacement at the connecting, or master link. The front chain does not have a connecting link. It is necessary to remove the compensating and clutch sprockets before the chain is removed for replacement. Repair of the front chain is not recommended. See "Disassembling Clutch," Section 3, for removal of sprockets.

FRONT CHAIN ADJUSTMENT (Figure 2-1 )

Remove rear pivot bolt from left footboard and swing rear end of footboard down, away from chain cover. Remove 8 cover attaching screws and remove cover. Front chain tension is adjusted by means of a shoe (1) which is raised or lowered underneath the chain to tighten or loosen it. The shoe support bracket (2) moves up or down in slotted backplate (3) after loosening center bolt (4) in backplate nut. Adjust shoe support as necessary to obtain specified up and down free movement in upper strand of chain midway between sprockets and retighten bolt securely.

Front chain adjustment:

5/8 to 7/8 in. chain slack with cold engine

3/8 to 5/8 in. chain slack with hot engine.

Shoe support bracket (2) and outer plate (5) have two sets of shoe attaching holes (A and B) so that entire assembly can be inverted to accommodate various sprocket sizes oi chain lengths. To change over, remove center bolt (4), re move two shoe attaching capscrews (6) from set of holes (A), invert shoe and attach to alternate set of holes (B) with capscrews (6). Invert support bracket and outer plate and reattach with center bolt engaged in backplate nut

REAR CHAIN ADJUSTMENT (Figure 2-2)

Remove cotter pin (1) and loosen brake anchor castle nul (2). Loosen axle nut (3). Turn adjusting nuts (4) as neces sary to move axle and correctly readjust the chain. Turr each nut an equal number of turns in order to keep wheel in alignment. To move axle (5) forward it will be necessary to tap lightly on ends of studs.

1. Cotter pin

2. Brake anchor nut

3. Axle nut

4. Axle adjusting nuts

5. Rear axle

6. Rear chain

Harley Washer Inner Chain Cover

WARNING — Whenever primary chain cover is removed, first disconnect battery cable from starter solenoid to prevent accidental starter operation and possible injury.

vvun weigm or riuer on moiorcycie, a correcuy aujusieu rear chain should have 1/2 in. free play (up and down movement) halfway between transmission sprocket and rear wheel sprocket. Check correct alignment of the wheel to see that the tire runs about midway between rear fork and also that the rear sprocket runs centrally in the chain.

When readjustment is completed, tighten axle nut (3) to 50 ft-lbs torque. Tighten brake anchor nut (2) finger tight. Install cotter pin (2).

FRONT CHAIN LUBRICATION

A fixed amount of oil is supplied through an oil line from metering orifice in the oil pump. Oil drops on front chain from oiler outlet tube (7, figure 2-1). Excess oil collects at rear of chain compartment and is drawn back into engine gearcase breather.

When the front chain adjustment is checked at 1250 mile intervals, also check to see that oil comes out of oiler tube when engine is running, when viewing through cover inspection hole. If oil does not come from oiler, the supply orifice at pump is probably blocked due to accumulation of dirt, and requires cleaning. To do this, remove orifice screw and washer from oil pump and blow out passage to chain compartment with compressed air.

REAR CHAIN LUBRICATION (Figure 2-3)

Motorcycle is equipped with a rear chain oiler. At regular 300 mile intervals, make a close inspection of rear chain. If rear chain does not appear to be getting sufficient lubrication, or if there is evidence of an over-supply of oil, readjustment should be made with rear chain oiler adjusting screw. The rear chain oiler is located on the oil pump as shown below. Normal setting is 1/4 turn open which provides 2 or 3 drops per minutes.

If chain oiler is not being used, brush dirt off chain and lubricate at 1250 mile intervals with Harley-Davidson "Chain Saver," "Chain Spray" or "Chain Grease" if available; if not available, use engine oil.

Figure 2-3. Rear Chain Oiler Adjustment

If the motorcycle is operated under extremely dusty or dirty conditions, thorough cleaning and lubrication of the rear chain may be advisable from time to time. Under these conditions, proceed as follows:

CLEANING CHAIN OILER

Normal setting of adjusting screw is 1/4 turn open. If orifice becomes blocked it will be necessary to clean as follows:

Turn adjusting screw inward until it bottoms on its seat. Keep a count of the number of turns.

Remove adjusting screw and clean orifice with compressed air.

Re-install adjusting screw and turn it inward until it bottoms on its seat.

Turn adjusting screw outward the same number of turns determined in step 2.

LUBRICATION - UNUSUAL CONDITIONS

If motorcycle is operated under extremely dusty condi tions, additional lubrication of the rear chain may be ad visable from time to time. Under these conditions remove chain from motorcycle. Soak and wash tho roughly in a pan of solvent such as kerosene. After re moving chain from kerosene, allow kerosene to drain ofl or blow off with air hose. After chain is completely dry apply Harley-Davidson "Chain Spray," "Chain Saver,' or "Chain Grease," following instructions on containei label. Wipe all surplus lubricant from surface of chain Install chain on motorcycle, inspect connecting link anc spring clip closely for bad condition. Replace if at all questionable. Be sure clip is correctly and securely locked on pin ends with open end of clip trailing direction of chain travel.

REMOVING AND INSTALLING REAR CHAIN

Locate and remove spring on connecting link. Connecting link having press fit in side plate can be pressed apart with Chain Tool, Part No. 95020-38 which is supplied in accessory rider tool kit. A Shop Tool is available under Part No. 95021-29 for this purpose. To install new press fit connecting link, use Rear Chain Assembling Tool, Part No. 95020-66.

GAUGING REAR CHAIN WEAR

When chain has been removed for cleaning, check it for elongation caused by wear as follows:

Figure 2-3. Rear Chain Oiler Adjustment

Lay chain on a flat surface.

NOTE

2. Take up the play in the links by pushing the chain ends toward each other, a few links at a time.

3. When the chain is fully compressed, measure its length. Stretch the chain to its full length and measure again. Replace rear chain if play exceeds 1 in.

GAUGING FRONT CHAIN WEAR

Front chain is not equipped with a connecting link so it cannot be opened for checking. Replace chain when it has worn to the point that it cannot be properly adjusted.

REMOVING AND INSTALLING FRONT CHAIN

Remove chain housing cover and lower front chain ten-sioner shoe as previously described under "Front Chain Adjustment." Then remove engine sprocket and clutch sprocket as described in "Disassembling Clutch," Section 4.

Engine sprocket is aligned with clutch sprocket by a selection of spacers beteen sprocket and alternator rotor. Reinstall same thickness of spacers as you removed, or determine correct spacer size as follows:

With clutch disassembled from clutch hub and compensating sprocket disassembled from sprocket shaft as shown, determine spacer (4, figure 2-4) thickness as follows:

Example (refer to figure 2-4)

1. Measure from chain cover surface to alternator rotor flange 1-3/4 in.

2. Measure from chain cover surface to clutch disc friction surface 1-7/16 in.

3. Subtract measurement (Step 2) from measurement (Step 1) 5/16 in.

4. Spacer thickness from table 0.120 in.

spacer table

Dimension Step 3

Size

Part No.

Dimension Step 3

Size

Part No.

1/4 to 9/32 9/32 to 5/16 5/16 to 11/32

24033-70

24034-70

11/32 to 3/8 3/8 to 13/32 13/32 to 7/16

24036-70

24037-70

Figure 2-4. Determining Engine Sprocket Spacer Thickness to Secure Chain Alignment

WHEELS

GENERAL

Maximum tire mileage and good handling qualities are directly related to care given wheels and tires. A front tire kept in continuous service will wear irregularly and peaked and may affect handling, especially if over-inflated. It is important that correct tire pressure be maintained at all times. Tire pressure should be checked before riding when the tires are cold.

the motorcycle. The possible exception will be the case where there is serious frame or fork misalignment.

Keeping tires inflated to recommended pressure is of major importance. In many cases, this attention alone applied to a solo motorcycle will remedy faulty handling at high speeds.

It is advisable to rebalance wheels and tire, at least statically, whenever the tire and/or tube is replaced.

CHECK LIST

At regular intervals of approximately 5000 miles or if the motorcycle develops handling irregularities at high speed, check the following list for possible causes:

1. Loose wheel axle nuts. Tighten to 50 ft-lbs maximum.

2. Excessive wheel hub bearing play.

3. Loosened spokes.

4. Rear wheel out of alignment with frame and front wheel.

5. Rims and tires out-of-true sideways (tire run-out should not be more than 3/64 in.).

6. Rims and tires out-of-round or eccentric with hub (tire run-out should not be more than 3/32 in.).

7. Irregular or peaked front tire tread wear. Replace tire if handling is affected.

8. Tires over-inflated. Check "Tire Data" Section. Do not over-inflate.

9. Tire and wheel unbalanced. Static balancing alone may be satisfactory if dynamic balancing facilities are not at hand, however both are recommended. See "Wheel and Tire Balancing."

10. Steering head bearings loose or tight. Correct ad-ment and replace pitted or worn bearings and races. See "Forks."

11. Shock absorber not functioning normally. Check possible causes. See "Forks."

12. Rear fork bearings loose. Check possible causes. See "Forks."

13. Heavy front end loading; Non-standard equipment on the front end such as heavy radio receivers, extra lighting equipment or luggage, tends to cause unstable handling. Extra equipment on the front end should be held down to a minimum.

In most every case, high speed handling faults are caused by one or more of the foregoing conditions being present on

FRONT WHEEL

FL - REMOVING AND INSTALLING (Figure 2-5)

Block motorcycle under frame until front wheel is clear of ground. Disassemble in following order:

Remove axle caps (1), axle nut (2), lockwasher (3), and flat washer (4). Loosen the two slider cap nuts (5) and remove axle (6). The front wheel is now free to come out. Note position of hub cap (7) and spacer (8).

CAUTION — Do not operate the front brake lever when the front wheel is removed because the brake caliper piston may be forced out, requiring disassembly of the brake system to get it properly reseated.

When replacing the wheel, reverse the removal procedure. Align the brake pads while installing the wheel so that brake disc goes between the pads. Tighten axle nut (2) to 50 ft-lbs torque and then tighten the two slider cap nuts (5) to 11 ft-lbs torque.

2. Axle nut

3. Lockwasher

4. Flat washer

Figure 2-5. Front Wheel Removal — FL

2. Axle nut

3. Lockwasher

4. Flat washer

6. Axle

7. Hub cap

8. Spacer

9. Bleed fitting

10. Brake disc

11. Brake caliper

Figure 2-5. Front Wheel Removal — FL

1. Left side caliper

2. Right side caliper

3. Caliper mounting hardware (2 sets)

4. Slider cap hardware (2 sets)

5. Axle

6. Axle nut

7. Lock washer

8. Washer

9. Speedometer drive 10. Brake discs

Figure 2-6. Front Wheel - FX

FX - REMOVING AND INSTALLING (Figure 2-6)

Support motorcycle underneath frame with front wheel raised. Detach both the right and left caliper assemblies from the fork sliders by removing mounting hardware (3). Let caliper assemblies hang down loose out of the way as shown in figure. Remove axle nut (6), lock washer (7) and washer (8). Loosen slider cap hardware (4). With a soft hammer tap left end of axle (5) to loosen it and start it out. Pull axle (5) out of fork assembly. Remove front wheel assembly and speedometer drive (9). To reinstall wheel, reverse above procedure. Be sure speedometer drive (9) ear engages hole in wheel hub when installed. Securely tighten axle nut (6) to 50 ft-lbs and then tighten slider cap hardware (4) and caliper mounting bolts (3) to 11 ft-lbs torque. This will insure correct alignment of the fork sides.

CAUTION — Do not operate front brake lever when the front wheel is removed because a brake caliper piston may be forced out, requiring disassembly of the brake system to get it properly reseated.

REAR WHEEL

REMOVING AND INSTALLING (Figure 2-7)

Support rear end of motorcycle with rear wheel off the ground. Disconnect rear chain at connecting link (3) by removing spring clip (1) and side plate (2). Remove brake anchor nut cotter pin (5) and loosen castle nut (6).

Remove axle nut (7), lock washer (8), and washer (9). With a soft hammer, tap right end of axle (10) to loosen it and start it out. Pull axle out of fork assembly, noting position of spacer (11) between sprocket and fork side. Wheel is then free to come out the rear.

CAUTION — Do not operate rear brake pedal when rear wheel is removed because the brake caliper piston may be forced out of the bore, requiring disassembly of the brake system to get it properly reseated.

When reassembling wheel, reverse the removal procedure. Adjust rear chain (see "Rear Chain Adjustment"). Tighten axle nut to 50 ft-lbs torque. Tighten castle nut (6) finger tight. Install cotter pin (5).

Figure 2-7. Removing Rear Wheel

Figure 2-7A. Snap-on Bearing Puller

WHEEL HUBS

DISASSEMBLING AND ASSEMBLING 16 INCH WHEEL HUBS (Figures 2-8, 2-9)

Remove 2 retaining rings (1), washers (2), oil seals (3), spacers (4), and bearing cones (5).

Clean all parts in solvent and inspect for damage or wear. Replace parts as necessary. If bearing cones or cups need replacing, replace as a set. Use a standard bearing puller, such as the Snap-on® puller shown in Figure 2-7A, to remove the bearing cups (6) from hub (8). Inspect brake discs for warping, scoring or worn running surfaces. Replace as necessary. On spoked wheels, check spoke flanges for bent or damaged condition.

Figure 2-7. Removing Rear Wheel

Chain spring clip Chain side plate Chain connecting Drive chain Cotter pin Castle nut Axle nut Lock washer Washer Axle Spacer

Reassembly is basically the reverse ot disassembly with the following exceptions: Apply a liberal amount of grease to bearing cones before assembly. Lubricate lip of oil seal (3) before assembly. Press oil seal (3) into hub until it is 3/16 to 1/4 in. below outside edge of hub. Bearing end play should be 0.004 to 0.018 in. when axle nut is tightened to 50 ft-lbs torque. If end play is not correct, substitute a slightly longer or shorter spacer (7) as necessary.

substitute a slightly longer or shorter spacer (7) as necessary.

If brake disc (11), spacer (12) and sprocket (15) have been disassembled, make sure all mounting surfaces are clean and flat before reassembly. Tighten sprocket mounting nuts or bolts to 34 to 42 ft-lbs torque. Tighten brake disc mounting bolts to 21 to 27 ft-lbs torque.

1. Retaining ring (2)

7. Spacer

11. Brake disc

12. Spacer

15. Sprocket

Figure 2-8. 16 Inch, Spoked Wheel — FL Front and Rear, FX Rear

1. Retaining ring (2)

7. Spacer

8. Cast wheel

11. Brake disc

12. Spacer

14. Lock washer and nut (5)

15. Sprocket

Figure 2-9. 16 Inch Cast Wheel - FL Front and Rear, FX Rear

Figure 2-10. 19 Inch Spoked Wheel - FX Front

Oil seal (2) Spacer

Bearing cone (2) Bearing cup (2) Spacer

Figure 2-10. 19 Inch Spoked Wheel - FX Front

DISASSEMBLING AND ASSEMBLING 19 INCH WHEEL HUBS (Figures 2-10, 2-11)

Remove oil seals (1), spacer (2) and bearing cones (3). Spacer (5) may now be removed. Brake discs (6) are secured to hub (8) with screws (7).

Clean all parts in solvent and inspect for damage or wear. Replace parts as necessary. If bearing cones or cups need replacing, replace as a set. Use a standard bearing puller (see Figure 2-7A) to remove bearing cups. Inspect brake discs for warping, scoring or worn running surfaces. Replace as necessary. On spoked wheels, check spoke flanges for bent or damaged condition.

Reassembly is basically the reverse of disassembly with the following exceptions: Apply a liberal amount of Harley-Davidson Grease-All grease to bearing cones before assembly. Lubricate lip of oil seals (1) before assembly. Press oil seals (1) into hub flush with other surface. If brake discs (6) have been disassembled, make sure all mating surfaces are clean and flat. Apply Harley-Davidson "Stud and Bearing Mount," Part No. 99626-77, to threads of screws (7) and tighten to 16 ft-lbs torque. When wheel is mounted to motorcycle and axle nut is tightened to 50 ft-lbs torque, bearing end play should be 0.004 in. to 0.018 in. If end play is not correct, substitute a slightly longer or shorter spacer (5) as necessary.

Figure 2-11. 19 Inch Cast Wheel — FX Front

Figure 2-11. 19 Inch Cast Wheel — FX Front

2. Spacer

5. Spacer

8. Cast wheel

SPOKING WHEELS — 16 INCH

WHEEL LACING

1. There are two styles of 16" wheel hubs and they are identified as follows:

Early Style Hub - See Figure 2-12. Pick any outside spoke hole and sight straight across the hub. The first spoke hole to the right of the centerline is an inner spoke hole. Also, with the wheel assembled, all Inner spokes on opposite sides of the wheel angle in the same direction and all outer spokes on opposite sides of the wheel angle in the same direction. See Figure 2-12B.

Late Style Hub - See Figure 2-12A. Pick any outside spoke hole and sight straight across the hub. The first spoke hole to the right of the centerline is an outside spoke hole. Also, with the wheel assembled, all inner spokes on opposite sides of the wheel cross and all outer spokes on opposite sides of the wheel cross. See Figure 2-12C.

2. There are two thread patterns used on the spokes and nipples, Align all the spokes next to each other on a table. Match the fine-threaded spokes with fine-threaded nipples and coarse-threaded spokes with coarse-threaded nipples. Do not intermix the thread patterns. Also, straighten or replace any bent spokes.

3. Place the hub on the bench with either flange up.

4. See Figure 2-12 and 2-12A. Insert 10 spokes into the upper flange inner spoke holes. Swing the loose ends clockwise as far as they will go.

NOTE:

When lacing an old style hub, inner spokes may be started clockwise or counterclockwise because all inner spokes angle in the same direction.

5. See Figure 2-12B and 2-12C. The rim is divided into ten groups of spoke holes, 4 holes to a group. In each group, only one hole will be angled toward each upper flange inner spoke. Place the rim over the hub, either side up, and insert the spokes into these holes. Secure each spoke with a nipple screwed on the end about 3 turns, just enough to hold it in place.

Spoke Screwing Harley

Outer Rows of Spoke Holes

Inner Rows of Spoke

Holes

(Clockwise) m

Outer Spoke ! (Counterclockwise)

Line of Sight

Figure 2-12A. Late Style Hub

Inner Rows of Spoke

Holes

(Clockwise) m

hbhhhb

Outer Spoke ! (Counterclockwise)

Outer Rows of Spoke Holes

Line of Sight

Figure 2-12A. Late Style Hub

Figure 2-12B. Early Style Laced Wheel

When all 20 Inner spokes are installed, insert a spoke into an outside spoke hole on the same flange side. See Figure 2-12 and 2-12A.

See Figure 2-13. Swing the outer spoke in the opposite direction crossing over 4 inner spokes, and secure the spoke in the nearest hole angled towards it. Repeat the procedure for all outer spokes.

1041 Inner Spokes On Opposite Sides of Wheel Angle in Same Direction

Ten Groups of 4 Spokes

1041 Inner Spokes On Opposite Sides of Wheel Angle in Same Direction

Inner Spokes On Opposite Sides of Wheel Cross

Figure 2-12C. Late Style Laced Wheel

Inner Spokes On Opposite Sides of Wheel Cross

Ten Groups of 4 Spokes

Figure 2-12C. Late Style Laced Wheel

Figure 2-13. Cross-4 Pattern

First Outside Spoke — Cross 4 Inside Spokes

Figure 2-13. Cross-4 Pattern

NOTE

All Harley-Davldson laced wheels use a "cross-4" pattern. Each outer spoke must cross 4 inner spokes before entering rim hole.

8. Carefully flip the hub and rim assembly over and repeat the process. If lacing an early style hub, start by swinging the inner spokes in the same direction as the other side. On late style hubs, swing the inner spokes in the opposite direction as the other side so the inner spokes cross each other.

9. See "Truing Wheels."

Figure 2-14. Spoke Identification

2. See Figure 2-14A. Place hub on bench either side up. Insert one outer spoke (short-head)into any bottom flange hole and swing it clockwise. Insert an inner spoke (long-head) in the next hole to the left of the outer spoke. Swing the inner spoke counterclockwise over the outer spoke.

1455

Inner spoke (long head)

Outer spoke (short head)

Inner spoke (long head)

Outer spoke (short head)

Inner spoke (long head)

Figure 2-14A. Lacing 19" Wheel

See Figure 2-14A. Insert an inner spoke into the hole on the top flange that directly bisects the two spokes in the bottom flange. Insert all remaining spokes in both hub flanges alternating the inner and outer spokes.

SPOKING WHEELS — 19 INCH

NOTE:

The following procedure applies for both single ana dual disc wheels.

1. See Figure 2-14. Divide spokes into 2 groups. Inner spokes have long heads, outer spokes have short heads. There are also fine and coarse threaded spokes and nipples. Match up fine-threaded spokes with fine-threaded nipples and coarse-threaded spokes with coarse-threaded nipples. Do not inter-mix the thread patterns.

Inner spoke (long-head)

Outer spoke (short-head)

Figure 2-14. Spoke Identification

2. See Figure 2-14A. Place hub on bench either side up. Insert one outer spoke (short-head)into any bottom flange hole and swing it clockwise. Insert an inner spoke (long-head) in the next hole to the left of the outer spoke. Swing the inner spoke counterclockwise over the outer spoke.

Inner spoke (long-head)

Outer spoke (short-head)

4. See Figure 2-14B. With all 40 spokes inserted in hub, group all spokes on top flange into 2 bundles. Secure each group with throttle grips or tape to keep the spokes together.

5. Swing all bottom flange outer spokes (short-head) clockwise. Swing the inner spokes (long-head) counterclockwise, crossing over the outer spokes. Angle all spokes as far as they will go without overlapping the next "like" spoke. For instance, swing an outer spoke (short-head) clockwise as far as it will go before crossing another outer spoke.

1453

1453

Figure 2-14B. Bundling Top Spokes

6. Center the rim over the hub assembly. Undo each top bundle and fan the spokes out around the top rim edge.

7. See Figure 2-14C. The rim is divided into ten groups of spoke holes, 4 holes to a group. Each group has two holes on the left and two holes on the right, angled inward towards each other. Only one hole in each group will be angled toward the bottom flange Inner spoke (long-head). Lace all bottom flange inner spokes into these holes. Secure each spoke with a nipple screwed on the end about 3 turns.

NOTE

Hub and spoke assembly may have to be spun slightly within the rim to allow proper spoke-to-rim alignment. Keep the bottom flange spokes crossed in correct position when spinning the hub. Also, keep the top flange spokes fanned around the rim. If they fall off the rim and become tangled in the bottom flange spokes, the hub will not rotate and it might be necessary to unlace the wheel to untangle them.

8. Next lace the 10 bottom flange outer spokes (short-head). Only one hole in each group of rim spoke holes will be angled toward these spokes. Secure each spoke with a nipple screwed on about 3 turns.

NOTE

All Harley-Davidson laced wheels use a "cross-4" pattern. Each outer spoke must cross 4 Inner spokes before entering rim hole.

9. Lace all the top flange inner spokes, one at a time leaving the outer spokes resting on the rim. Swing the top flange inner spokes clockwise.

10. Now lace the top flange outer spokes. Swing them counterclockwise and make sure each one crosses 4 inner spokes before securing it to the rim.

11. See "Truing Wheels."

TRUING SPOKED WHEEL

1. See Figure 2-15. Divide the wheel spokes into 4 groups of 4 and mark the center of each group with a piece of tape. The groups should be directly across from one another and approximately 90° apart. Tighten the spokes in these four groups finger tight, leaving all others loose.

2. Install truing arbor in wheel hub and place wheel in Wheel Truing Stand, Part No. 95500-29A. Tighten arbor nuts so hub will turn on its bearings.

3. See Figure 2-16 and 2-17. The hub must be centered sideways with the rim. Lay a straightedge across the hub brake disc flange and one of the

Hub and spoke assembly may have to be spun slightly within the rim to allow proper spoke-to-rim

Figure 2-14C. Grouping the Spokes
Figure 2-15. Marking Spoke Groups

marked spoke groups. Measure the distance from the straightedge to the rim as shown. If this dimension is not equal on both sides of the wheel, loosen and tighten the 4 spokes accordingly. Use Spoke Wrench, Part No. 94681-39.

Example: If the measurement on the rim right side is greater than the left side, loosen the two spokes attached to the hub left side and tighten the two

Figure 2-16. Centering 16" Hub

spokes attached to the hub right side. Turn all 4 spokes an equal number of turns until dimension is equal to within 1/32" for both sides.

CAUTION

Always loosen the appropriate spokes before tightening the other two. Reversing this procedure will cause the rim to become out-of-round.

Figure 2-17. Centering 19" Hub

4. Repeat Step 3 for all four groups on the wheel.

5. See Figure 2-18. After rim has been centered sideways it must be checked and trued radially. Adjust truing stand gauge to the rims tire bead seat as shown. The rim should be trued within 1/32".

6. Spin the rim slowly. If the rim contacts the gauge on or near a marked group of spokes, loosen the spokes in the marked group on the opposite side of the rim. Now tighten the spokes in the group where the rim makes contact. Loosen and tighten spokes an equal number of turns.

If the rim contacts the gauge between two marked groups, loosen the spokes in both opposite groups and tighten the spoke groups on the side of the rim that makes contact.

7. When the wheel is centered and trued, start at the valve hole and tighten the rest of the spoke nipples one turn at a time until they are snug.

8. Seat each spoke head in the hub flange using a flat nose punch and hammer. Then check wheel true-ness again and tighten the nipples accordingly.

CAUTION

Do not tighten spokes too tight or nipples may be drawn through rim, or hub flanges may be distorted. But if spokes are left too loose, they will continue to loosen when wheel is put into service.

9. File or grind off ends of spokes protruding through nipples to prevent puncturing tube when tire is mounted.

Figure 2-18A. Checking Cast Rim Lateral Runout

Radial Runout

Figure 2-18. Truing Rim Radially

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