Handlebar Throttle Control

GENERAL

Control must operate freely and carburetor throttle must return to closed (Idle) position with friction adjusting screw (10, figure 2-22) backed off. If control becomes stiff and does not return properly, it should be disassembled, cleaned and inspected.

DISASSEMBLING THROTTLE CONTROL (Figure 2-22)

To disassemble and inspect throttle control assembly, remove the two screws (1) holding the upper throttle clamps (2) to the lower throttle clamp (3). Unhook ferrule (4) from ball on end of cable (5) and from throttle grip (6). Disconnect opposite end of cable from carburetor.

Turn out the hex fitting securing the cable (5) to the lower clamp (3) and remove cable assembly from motorcycle.

Remove the friction spring (7), set screw (8), spring (9) and adjusting screw (10) from lower clamp.

INSPECTION AND CLEANING

Clean all metal parts in non-flammable cleaning solvent. Blow dry with compressed air. Replace any broken, cracked, or worn parts. Replace cable assembly if it is frayed, kinked, or bent.

ASSEMBLING THROTTLE CONTROL

After inspection, position cable assembly (5) on motorcycle. Apply a light coat of graphite to handlebar (11) and inside surface of clamps (2 and 3). Attach lower throttle clamp (3) to cable assembly. Insert set screw (8), adjusting screw (10) and spring (9) in lower clamp. Place friction spring (7) in clamp. Be sure hole in spring (7) engages adjusting screw (10).

Place ridge of throttle (6), positioned on handlebar, into groove of lower throttle clamp (3). Position ferrule (4) over ball of cable (5) and seat in throttle notch. Secure with upper clamp (2) and two screws (1). Tighten screws (1) to 12 to 16 in-lbs torque.

ADJUSTMENT

1. When turned by hand and then released, the throttle lever must return throttle grip (6) to the closed or idle position. If throttle grip (6) does not return to idle position freely, back off of adjusting screw (10) until this is accomplished. If the throttle grip turns stiffly, it should be disassembled, cleaned and inspected thoroughly.

Figure 2 22. Handlebar Throttle Control WARNING

Do not overtighten the friction screw. Operation with the friction screw overtightened is not recommended because of possible hazard involved when the engine will not return to idle position automatically in an emergency.

2. Adjust throttle cable "free play" by turning adjusting nut (13) to desired position. The cable should not put pressure on the carburetor lever when handlebars are turned to left and right stops.

3. With handlebars in straight ahead position, adjust grip travel limit. To adjust for grip travel limit, turn throttle to open position and adjust set screw (8) with a 2mm (Allen) wrench. The throttle grip should be in fully open position as the carburetor lever reaches fully open position.

CAUTION

This adjustment is necessary to prevent excess stress and potential failure of the throttle cable.

7. Friction spring

8. Set screw

9. Spring

10. Adjusting screw

11. Handlebar

12. Grip plug

13. Adjusting nut

Screw (2) Upper throttle clamp Lower throttle clamp Ferrule

Control cable assembly Throttle grip

FRAME

GENERAL Because straightening a badly bent frame requires special tools and fixtures for holding, bending and gauging, this service is only offered by some of the larger dealerships.

To rough check a frame for correct alignment, see figure 2-23. The dimensions shown will provide basic information to determine whether a frame is enough out of alignment to require a major realigning job or replacement.

NOTE

Replace all bent or broken frames. The cost of repair would be prohibitive.

Figure 2-23. Frame with Basic Dimensions

2-17

FORKS

GENERAL

The front fork is comprised of two sets of telescoping tubes that work against springs, with an oil filled (hydraulic) dampening mechanism to control the action. The unit is engineered to give long service with a minimum of repair. Front fork oil should be changed at the initial 500 mile interval and at 5000 mile intervals thereafter.

Non-adjustable forks are for use on a solo motorcycle. The fork "trail" (the distance, at ground level, from the fork stem axis to a perpendicular through the wheel axle) is set and cannot be adjusted.

The adjustable fork is for use on a motorcycle which operates with and without a sidecar. It is essentially the same as the non-adjustable fork except it has a two-position bracket that allows the trail to be changed for best solo or sidecar-equipped operation and a steering damper adjusting mechanism which dampens the steering for operation with sidecar. All other adjustments and repairs are made exactly as on the non-adjustable fork. This fork may be recognized by the reversible bracket bolt washers, bolt and stem design (18, 19, 20, figure 2-27) as described in "Adjusting Front Fork Trail."

CHANGING OIL

Remove fork upper bracket bolt or filler screw and washer. Remove drain plug at the outside bottom of each slider tube and drain. Draining speed will be increased by gently flexing the fork as it empties. Replace drain plugs and pour specified amount of Harley-Davidson Type E Fork oil into each tube. Measure amount very carefully. Flow of oil into tubes will be increased if fork is worked up and down during filling operation. Replace upper bracket bolts and tighten securely.

Amount

Fork Oil Type

Wet

Dry

FL

7% oz.

8V2 oz.

Harley-Davidson Type E

FX

5 oz.

6oz.

Harley-Davidson Type E

The difference in the amount of oil required between a DRY and a WET fork is due to oil cling.

The fork filling device shown in figure 2-24 will hasten and simplify the filling operation. The unit consists of a Neo-prene (not rubber) stopper to fit the hole in the top of the fork, a length of flexible tubing, a funnel and an appropriate size can, soldered to the top of the funnel.

1. To make a filler can, drill a dozen 1/4 in. holes in thi bottom of a one quart tin can (2), near the outside edge. Shape the bottom of the can with a light hammer so that ¡1 is dished upward to assure complete draining of oil through the holes.

2. Select a tin funnel (3) with the funnel mouth about the same size as the bottom of can (2). Swage and shape the funnel spout so that a piece of 1/4 in. metal tubing (4), about 2 in. long, (a piece of fuel line is suitable) can be soldered into it. Solder (3) onto the bottom of (2). Improvise and attach bail (1) to the filler can.

Figure 2-24. Fork Filler Can Components

1. Bail

2. Filler can

3. Tin funnel

4. Metal tubing

5. Flexible tubing

6. Metal tubing

7. Rubber plug

8. Fork tube cap

2-19

Figure 2-25. Filling Hydraulic Fork with Oil

3. Make plug (7) from a neoprene bottle stopper purchased from a drug store. Neoprene stopper should be 1 in. to 1-1/8 in. long, and its largest diameter about 5/8 in.

4. Hold stopper in vise and drill a 3/32 In. hole lengthwise through the center. Then enlarge the hole with a 1/4 in. drill. After hole is drilled in the stopper, insert a 1/4 in. rod through the hole and grind the stopper to a 5/8 in. diameter at the large end, and slightly under 1/2 in. diameter at the small end, straight taper between ends, to form the plug.

5. Slightly flare one end of a piece of 1/4 in. tubing (6), about 2 in. long and insert into plug (7). Attach filler can to plug with transparent flexible tubing (5) about 2 feet long. See figure 2-25.

6. Push the plug into the tiller hole in TorK top, ngure 2-25. Pour exact amount of oil into can. Work fork up and down. Air escaping through oil in filler can as fork is pushed downward will cause the oil to bubble violently, but because the bottom of the can serves as a baffle, no oil will be lost. Compressing the fork forces air out, releasing it draws oil into fork.

7. After the can appears to be empty, allow several minutes for can to completely drain, then work fork once more. This assures getting into fork side the full quantity of oil poured into can.

INSPECTION PROCEDURE

If the hydraulic fork does not work properly or an appreciable amount of oil leakage should develop, inspect the fork as follows:

Check the oil level in each fork side by completely draining and refilling fork as described in "CHANGING FORK OIL." Be sure correct amount of oil is used to refill fork tubes. An insufficient or excess supply of oil will result in faulty recoil action. When draining oil, check for signs of water in the oil. Oil will appear emulsified, aerated or light brown in color. Leakage of oil from forks would indicate replacement of seals and O-rings is needed. See "DISASSEMBLING FRONT FORKS."

If action of front forks remains unsatisfactory after oil change, completely disassemble and inspect forks.

ADJUSTING STEERING DAMPER

Turn steering damper adjusting screw (26, figure 2-27) clockwise to apply dampening action and counterclockwise to reduce dampening action. Apply steering damper only when operating under conditions where some degree of dampening stabilizes steering. It is best to keep the damper set a little snug when operating with a sidecar

ADJUSTING FRONT FORK TRAIL - ADJUSTABLE FORK (Figure 2-27)

To adjust fork trail for use with sidecar, turn off nut on bracket bolt (35). Tap bolt head back far enough to pry out washer (36). Grasp fork tubes and pull forward sharply. It may be necessary to loosen upper bracket bolts (2) to move fork forward or backward. Revolve bracket bolt washers 180 degrees until pin on washer is forward. Seat washer pin in slot in bracket (22) boss. Tap bracket bolt (35) into position and turn on nut.

To adjust fork for solo riding, follow same procedure except push fork tubes back and insert washer (36) so pins are rearward.

Nj

1. Bracket clamping bolt (2)

2. Upper bracket bolt and oil seal (2) Fork tube cap O-ring

5. Spring

6. Screw

7. Washer Shock absorber tube Wear ring (2) Spring Sleeve Fork tube Fork slider Lock ring

16. Washer Lock washer Fork stem nut Upper bracket Head bearing nut Dust shield

Lower bracket and stem Bearing cone (2) Bearing race (2) Bearing cup (2)

Figure 2-26. FL Non-Adjustable Fork — Exploded View r

1. Bracket clamping bolt (2)

2. Upper bracket bolt and washer (2)

18. Fork stem nut

19. Upper bracket

20. Head bearing nut

21. Dust shield

22. Lower bracket

23. Bearing cone (2)

24. Bearing race (2)

26. Steering damper adjusting screw

27. Spring

28. Spider spring cover

29. Spider spring

30. Pressure disc (2)

31. Friction washer (2)

32. Anchor plate

33. Friction washer

34. Pressure disc

35. Bracket bolt with nut and cotter pin

36. Bracket bolt washer (2)

37. Bracket with stem

Missing items are shown in Figure 2-26

Figure 2-27. FL Adjustable Fork — Exploded View

FL FRONT FORK

REMOVING FORK SIDES (Figures 2-26, 2-27)

If necessary repairs involve only fork sides, the entire fork need not be disassembled.

To remove fork side, proceed as follows:

1. Remove the fairing, windshield, headlamp, headlamp housing, front wheel, brake caliper assembly, and front fender.

2. Loosen fork bracket clamping bolts (1). Remove fork upper bracket bolt oil seal or bolt and lock washer (2). Pull fork side out bottom of lower fork bracket.

DISASSEMBLING FORK SIDE (Figures 2-26, 2-27)

Remove fork tube cap (3). Remove O-ring (4) from cap. Remove spring (5) and drain oil from fork side. Remove screw (6) and washer (7). Shock absorber tube (8) may now be pulled from fork side. Remove wear rings (9) from slots in shock absorber tube. Remove spring (10) and sleeve (11).

Separate fork tube (12) and fork slider (13) by pulling the two apart. Remove seals (15) only if they are to be replaced. Remove lock ring (14) and then pry out seals (15). Discard the damaged seals. Remove washer (16).

Thoroughly clean and inspect each part. If inspection shows that any parts are bent, broken or damaged, those parts should either be replaced or repaired.

Inspect seals (15) for wear. If they were removed, they must be replaced. Inspect wear rings (9) on damper tube (8) and replace if excessively worn or damaged. Replace springs (5 and 10) if broken or distorted.

Inspect small hole in groove in lower end of fork tube (12) and see that it is not obstructed.

Make sure O-ring (4) is in good condition, without any irregularities, and that it provides proper sealing when in place.

Check washer (7) to see that it provides a good seal when used with its respective screw (6) to prevent oil leakage.

Repair bent or damaged fork tube (12) as described in "Straightening Fork Tubes" later in this section.

REMOVING FORK STEM AND BRACKET ASSEMBLY FROM STEERING HEAD

Non-Adjustable Fork (Figure 2-26)

Remove fork sides as described previously. Remove horn. Remove flasher mounting hardware.

Bend tab on lock washer (17) down and remove fork stem nut (18). Lift up upper bracket (19) and handlebar assembly and set it aside. Use wrench. Part No. 96219-50 to remove head bearing nut (20). Remove dust shield (21). Pull lower fork bracket and stem (22) out bottom of frame steering head. Remove bearing cones (23).

Adjustable Fork (Figure 2-27)

Remove fork sides as described previously. Remove horn. Remove flasher mounting hardware.

Turn out steering damper adjusting screw (26) and lift out parts 27 through 34. Parts 30 and 34 may be loosened by inserting a screwdriver tip between parts and prying upward.

Remove stem nut (18). Lift up upper bracket (19) and handlebar assembly and set it aside. Remove head bearing nut (20) using special wrench, Part No. 96219-50. Remove dust shield (21). Pull lower fork bracket and stem (22) out bottom of steering head. Remove bearing cones (23).

REPAIRING STEERING HEAD AND BEARINGS

Each steering head bearing consists of two pieces, the bearing outer race, and the roller bearing with inner race. The outer races are pressed into the steering head cups in the frame head. The lower roller bearing is assembled over the fork stem and the upper roller bearing is held in place on the fork stem by the upper fork bracket and nut on the upper threaded end of the fork stem.

After fork is removed inspect bearings and races for pitting, roughness or wear. Roughness of the roller bearings can be determined by rolling the bearings on the bearing races by hand. If bearings or races require replacement it is best to replace them in sets.

To replace bearing races, knock head cup from steering head using a suitable drift. Press new bearing race in new head cup and then press assembly into frame head.

ASSEMBLING FORK SIDES (Figure 2-26, 2-27)

Assembly is the reverse of disassembly with the following exception: Fill fork sides with exactly 8% ounces of Harley-Davidson, Type B, fork oil.

INSTALLING FORK STEM AND BRACKET ASSEMBLY, FORK SIDES AND ADJUSTING STEERING HEAD BEARINGS (Figures 2-26, 2-27)

Assembly is the reverse of disassembly. Apply a heavy coating of grease to bearing cones.

After fork sides are assembled to upper and lower bracket, tighten fork bracket clamping bolts (1) to 22 to 26 ft-lbs torque.

Assemble front fender, brake caliper and wheel to motorcycle before checking head bearing adjustment.

Fork should have free movement to either side. There should be no noticeable shake or sideways movement of the front fork. To adjust steering head bearings, tighten or loosen head bearing nut (20) as required, while tapping on bracket (22).

When bearings are correctly adjusted, install fork stem nut (18) and bend up tab on lock washer (17).

FX FRONT FORK

REMOVING FORK SIDES (Figure 2-28)

Remove front wheel and brake assembly as described in WHEEL section of this manual. Remove front fender. Remove bracket that attaches headlamp to the upper fork bracket and let hang loose by wiring harness.

Remove two screws (1) so cover (2) can be slid up out of the way, exposing the lower fork bracket. Loosen fork tube pinch bolts (3). Loosen screw (9) in upper fork bracket (5). Unscrew fork tube cap (6) from fork tube. Remove fork side (7) completely by sliding down and out of both upper and lower fork brackets. Drain oil from fork side.

DISASSEMBLING FORK SIDE (Figure 2-29)

Remove O-ring (3) from inner groove in tube cap (1) ana slide off washer (4). Pull spring (5) out of fork tube (2).

Figure 2-28. FX Front Fork - Exploded View

FRAME

2. Cover

5. Upper bracket

8. Fork stem nut

9. Pinch screw

10. Upper bearing shield

11. Bearing cone

12. Fork stem and bracket

13. Bearing cone

14. Lower dust shield

15. Upper bearing race

16. Lower bearing race

17. Screw insert (2)

18. Brake caliper bushings (4)

Using an alien wrench, remove screw (6) along with washer (7) from bottom end of fork slider (8). This will free shock absorber tube (9) so that it can be removed from fork tube (2). Remove both fiber wear rings (10) from slots in shock absorber tube (9).

Separate fork tube (2) and fork slider (8) by pulling the two apart. Slip fork boot (11) off end of fork slider (8). Remove damper tube sleeve (12) from inside fork slider (8) by carefully pulling out past seal (14). Remove seal (14) only if it is to be replaced. Remove lock ring (13) and then pry out seal (14), discarding the damaged seal.

Thoroughly clean and inspect each part. If inspection shows that any parts are bent, broken or damaged, those parts should be either repaired or replaced.

Inspect seal (14) for wear. If seal was removed, a new one must be installed. Inspect both wear rings (10) on damper tube (9) and replace if worn excessively or damaged.

SHOWA

1.

Tube cap

9. Shock absorber tube

2.

Fork tube

10. Wear rings

3.

O-ring

11. Boot

4.

Washer

12. Damper tube sleeve

5.

Spring

13. Lock ring

6.

Screw

14. Seal

7.

Washer

15. Screw

8.

Fork slider

16. Washer

Figure 2-29. FX Front Fork - Exploded View

Check boot (11) where it rubs on fork tube (2). The tube should show a bright, shining surface, free of scoring or abrasions and the boot should present a good, continuous seal and not show excessive wear.

Replace spring (5) if broken.

Inspect small hole in groove in lower end of fork tube (2) and see that it is not obstructed.

Make sure O-ring (3) is in good condition, without irregularities, and that it provides proper sealing when in place.

Check both washers (7 and 16) to see that they provide a good seal when used with their respective screws (6 and 15) to prevent oil leakage.

Repair bent or damaged fork tube (2) as described in "Straightening Fork Tubes" later in this section. Reassemble parts in reverse order of disassembly.

REMOVING FORK STEM AND BRACKET ASSEMBLY FROM STEERING HEAD (Figure 2-28)

Remove fork sides as described under "Removing Fork Sides." Remove fork stem nut (8) and loosen fork upper bracket pinch bolt (9). Lift handlebar assembly from steering head with fork upper bracket (5) attached. Carefully position assembly away from working area. Be careful not to bend control wires more than necessary.

It is not necessary to disconnect clutch and brake hand-levers from handlebar, wiring harnesses or control cables from handlebar unless handlebar assembly is to be removed from motorcycle.

Remove upper bearing shield (10) and upper bearing cone (11). Drop fork stem and bracket assembly (12) and remove bearing cone (13) and lower dust shield (14).

REPAIRING STEERING HEAD AND BEARINGS

Each steering head bearing consists of two pieces, the bearing outer race, and the roller bearing with inner race. The outer races are pressed into the steering head cups in the frame head. The lower roller bearing is assembled over the fork stem and the upper roller bearing is held in place on the fork stem by the upper fork bracket and nut on the upper threaded end of the fork stem.

After fork is removed inspect bearings and races for pitting, roughness or wear. Roughness of the roller bearings can be determined by rolling the bearings on the bearing races by hand. If bearings or races require replacement it is best to replace them in sets.

To replace bearing races (15 and 16, figure 2-29), knock head cup from steering head using a suitable drift. Press new bearing race in new head cup and then press assembly into frame head.

ASSEMBLING FRONT FORK SIDES (Figure 2-29)

Assembly is the reverse of disassembly with the following exceptions: Fill fork sides with exactly 6 oz. of Harley-Davidson, Type B, fork oil.

INSTALLING STEM AND BRACKET ASSEMBLY, FORK SIDES AND ADJUSTING STEERING HEAD BEARINGS (Figure 2-28)

Assembly of the fork is the reverse of disassembly. Assemble the head cups, races, bearing cones and dust shields. Apply a heavy coating of Harley-Davidson Grease-All grease to bearing cones.

Insert fork lower bracket stem (12) up through steering head and assemble upper bracket (5) and stem nut (8) loosely. Install fork sides (7). With forks correctly aligned, tighten fork tube caps (6) with pinch bolts (3) loose. Install front fender and front wheel.

With fork sides, wheel and fender reassembled, fork should have smooth free movement to either side. There should be no appreciable shake or sideways movement of the front fork. To adjust steering head bearings, tighten or loosen stem nut (8) as required, while tapping on bracket (5). When bearings are correctly adjusted, tighten pinch bolts (3, and 9) to 22 to 26 ft-lbs torque.

STRAIGHTENING FORK TUBES

Straightening fork tubes requires several special tools including hydraulic or arbor press, dial indicator and straightening blocks.

Never attempt to straighten a fork tube that has a sharp angle bend. It should be scrapped because the metal is stretched.

1. Before beginning the straightening operation, clean the fork tube. Locate bends with dial indicator. A fork tube is usually bent in two or three places, seldom only one. Place fork tube on straightening blocks. Correct bend in tube with an arbor or hydraulic press.

2. Find the highest point out-of-round with a dial indicator (figure 2-30) and mark with chalk. Press high point as shown in figure 2-31. Repeat indicating and pressing operations until tube is within 0.003 in. to 0.004 in. of being straight.

Figure 2-30. Indicating High Point

3. Sometimes fork tubes are out-of-round, especially at the point it is clamped in the fork bracket. Place tube in straightening blocks and press until perfectly round as shown in figure 2-32, checking with dial indicator and micrometer. Finally, check tube by inserting in new fork slider. Work tube up and down. If it does not bind, it is straight.

STRAIGHTENING FORK STEM AND BRACKET ASSEMBLY

Straightening a fork stem and bracket assembly requires a great deal of skill, experience and several tools and fixtures. Special tools necessary include Fork Tube Straightening blocks. Part No. 96246-50, four blocks are needed; Bending Bar, Part No. 96806-40; Fork Stem and Bracket Aligning Gauge, Part No. 96245-51. In addition, the following pieces of bar stock are needed: Two bars, 1-5/8 in. diameter, about 12 in. long; two bars 1 in. x 4 in. x 12 in. (approximately); assorted pieces of rectangular bar stock to use in transmitting arbor press pressure to unit to be straightened.

To straighten stem and bracket, proceed as follows;

1. Insert the two 1-5/8 in. x 12 in. bars in fork bracket and secure with two clamping studs. Sometimes the bracket is so badly bent that the bars cannot be inserted. In this case, press the bars into place with an arbor press, then press on the front edge of bracket to correct the "bow" distortion as shown in figure 2-33.

2. A bracket assembly is usually out of alignment along the horizontal centerline, with one or both legs bent.

NOTE

Reference to vertical and horizontal centerlines applies to bracket and fork stem as positioned on arbor press (see figure 2-33).

Figure 2-32. Pressing Fork Tube Round

Figure 2-31. Pressing High Point

Figure 2-36. Bending Bracket Legs Parallel

Figure 2-33. Correcting Bracket Bow

Figure 2-35. Checking Bracket Alignment

Figure 2-34. Straightening Two Twisted Legs

Figure 2-36. Bending Bracket Legs Parallel

If both legs are twisted, place bracket assembly on arbor press as shown in figure 2-34 with blocks placed under two low legs only (A and B). With press block placed across bracket and bar assembly, press until high legs (C and D) are in alignment.

3. If one leg is bent, place bracket and bar assembly on three straightening blocks, two blocks under straight lec and one block under low end of other leg. Place press block diagonally across bracket assembly to high leg until high lec is forced down and into alignment with the other three lec ends.

4. Place the fork stem and bracket assembly on the four straightening blocks located on the surface plate (see figure 2-35). If the legs rest squarely on straightening blocks, the bracket assembly is correctly trued on a horizontal plane. If bracket is not true, press again, checking alignment after each operation.

5. Use a square to check if bracket assembly is bent, distorted or out of parellel on a horizontal plane as shown in figure 2-36. Place bracket and bar assembly in a heavy vise and straighten using the Bending Bar.

6. Check fork stem alignment with Fork Stem and Bracket Aligning Gauge as shown in Figure 2-37. Use Bending Bar to bring stem into position. Recheck the fork completely.

Figure 2-35. Checking Bracket Alignment

Figure 2-33. Correcting Bracket Bow

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Figure 2-37. Checking Stem Alignment With Gauge

REAR SHOCK ABSORBER

ADJUSTING REAR SHOCK ABSORBER SPRING

1. The rear shock absorber springs can be adjusted to three positions for the weight the motorcycle is to carry. The average weight solo rider would use the extended spring position (off cam); when in low position (off cam), the cam lobes should be next to each other: that is, single lobes and double lobes matched. If necessary, rotate the cam to line them up properly. A heavy solo rider might require the position with springs slightly compressed (first cam step); buddy seat riders require the fully compressed spring position (second cam step).

2. To adjust the rear shock absorber springs, turn cushion spring adjusting cam to desired cam position with Spanner Wrench, Part No. 94700-52B. Both cushion spring adjusting cams must be adjusted to the same position. Always back off cam in opposite direction when releasing spring tension to intermediate or solo position.

NOTE

If shock cam is turned too far so that t falls off top position, it will not be matched correctly with other cam. To correct this condition, continue 180 degrees in same direction until it falls off again and then adjust to desired position.

DISASSEMBLING REAR SHOCK ABOSRBER (Figure 2-38)

Position motorcycle on Service Stand, Part No. 96810-63.

ASSEMBLE CAMS (ITEM NO. 12) SO THAT THE HIGH LOBES (WITH NOTCHES IN THE TIPS) ARE NEXT TO EACH OTHER, AS SHOWN.

ASSEMBLE CAMS (ITEM NO. 12) SO THAT THE HIGH LOBES (WITH NOTCHES IN THE TIPS) ARE NEXT TO EACH OTHER, AS SHOWN.

mr~r

1. Mounting stud nut (2)

2. Mounting stud washer

3. Stud cover

5. Stud rubber bushing (2)

6. Split key

9. Spring mr~r

10. Seal washer

11. Adjusting cup

13. Shock absorber unit

14. Cam support

Figure 2-38. Later Rear Shock Absorber — Exploded View

2-29

Remove top and bottom mounting stud nut (1), mounting stud washer (2), upper stud cover (3) and cup washer (4). Slip shock absorber assembly off upper and lower studs. Push rubber bushings (5) from shock absorber mounting eyes. Place shock absorber in Rear Shock Absorber Tool, Part No. 97010-52A with split key (6) up. Compress absorber spring enough to remove each half of split key (6) from flange on shock eye as shown in figure 2-39. Release spring compression and remove absorber assembly from tool. Remaining items can be removed in order shown in figure 2-38.

INSPECTING

1. Examine absorber unit for traces of fluid leaking, especially at upper end. Unit should have no leaks and should compress slightly easier than it extends. If possible, compare action with unused unit. Shock absorbers cannot be repaired. Faulty units must be replaced.

2. Clean and examine all other parts for wear and damage, paying particular attention to the condition of the stud rubbers, the ride control adjustment cams, dirt seal and spring.

ASSEMBLING REAR SHOCK ABSORBER

Rear shock absorber assembly is essentially the reverse of disassembly.

Apply a thin coat of grease to all surfaces of both cams. Note that cams (12) are identical and be sure to position

Figure 2-39. Disassembling Shock Absorber

cam lobes correctly as shown in figure 2-38 inset. Place assembly in compressor tool and compress spring enough tc install key halves (6). Release spring compression. Keys will lock into place in inside diameter of covers 7 or 7A.

IMPORTANT

Install each shock absorber on motorcycle with slot in cam support (A, figure 2-38) facing toward wheel.

REAR FORK

DISASSEMBLING REAR FORK (Figure 2-40) To disassemble rear fork, first remove following assemblies:

2. Rear brake mounting bracket and torque arm (see "Brakes").

3. Rear shock absorbers (see "Shock Absorbers").

4. See figure 2-40. Turn back locking ear on pivot bolt lock washer (2) and turn out pivot bolt (1). Remove fork (3) from frame. With appropriate size arbor pin, push out bearing spacer (4), bearing seal (5) and bearing with outer race (6) from each side of fork pivot bearing.

INSPECTING AND SERVICING

1. Clean pivot bolt hole in fork and bearing parts. Check for wear of bearing, bearing race and bearing seal.

2. Rough check the rear fork for correct alignment. Di mensions shown in figure 2-40 will provide enough information to determine if fork is far enough out of alignment tc require realigning or replacement. Straightening a badly bent fork requires special tools and fixtures for holding, bending and gaging.

ASSEMBLING REAR FORK

1. Press outer bearing races into fork. Grease bearing; with Harley-Davidson "Grease-All" grease and insert. Apply additional grease to outside face of bearing so that space between bearing and seal will be filled when seal is installed. Grease bearing seals in groove between sealing lips and press into place. Put bearing spacers over seals.

NOTE

Apply additional quantity of grease to fitting in fork pivot housing with hand grease gun to fill space between bearings. A very small quantity of

Figure 2-40. Rear Fork — Exploded View

1. Pivot bolt

2. Pivot bolt lock washer

3. Rear fork

4. Pivot bearing spacer (2)

7. Grease fitting

grease should be applied to fitting with hand grease gun at 2500 mile intervals.

2. Assemble pivot bolt with lock washer and tighten bolt to preload bearings one to two pounds as follows:

3. With bearings free, weigh extreme rear end of fork by attaching a spring scale and raising the fork to a horizontal position. Tighten bearing pivot bolt just enough to increase bearing drag one to two pounds.

For example, if fork with bearings free weighs four pounds, tighten pivot bolt until fork movement to horizontal position registers five to six pounds on scale. Lock pivot bolt lock washer.

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