Disassembling Engine For Complete Overhaul

Disassembling O.H.V. Engine

(After Removing From Chassis Completely Assembled)

1. Remove upper-end parts as outlined under "Disassembling Engine for Top Overhaul Only" (O.H.V. Engine). Page 37.

2. Remove pistons. See "Piston and Pin," Page 88.

3. Remove generator as outlined under "Removing Generator," Page 97.

4. Remove circuit breaker assembly irom crank-case: Free low tension wire from clip on crank-case—if wire J3 shielded, disconnect metallic shielding from crankcase stud. Remove relay and relay bracket. Remove two cap screws (9) (see Illus. 66) and then circuit breaker completely assembled can be lifted off. Be careful not to damage base gasket if new one is not available.

5. Remove gear case cover: Remove gear case cover screws and cover is then free to be removed. Cover is located on dowel pins which fit rather snugly and it must be worked off these pins carefully to avoid damage to cover and joint faces. Do not pry off with screwdriver inserted between joint faces. Use a hammer and a block of wood and tap lightly at the ends where the cover projects beyond the gear case.

Unless a new gasket is available, be very careful not to damage or break the old one as this gasket is special as concerns thickness and hole for oil passage. It should be replaced with a "factory-made" gasket.

6. Remove timing gears: After removing lock rings and collars from gear studs, gears, breather valve and pinion shaft fittings, except gear shaft bearing oil seal ring can be removed. Gear shaft bearing oil seal ring cannot be removed until after removal of oil pump drive gear.

7. Remove oil pump: 1940 and earlier Model pump —remove the six nuts and washers that secure pump to crankcase. 1941 to 1947 Model pump-remove in order named, the five nuts, one cap screw and washers that secure pump to crankcase, pump cover, governor rotor, cover plate and the countersunk flat head screw that secures pump to crankcase.

Remove lock ring, and drive shait gear and key from inner end (inside gear case) of pump drive shaft, and then pump with shaft assembled can be removed from crankcase.

Unless new gaskets are available, be very careful not to damage or break the old ones. These are special gaskets as concerns both thickness and holes for oil passages. It is not advisable to attempt to replace them with "home-made" gaskets. Leaving out one hole or getting one in the wrong location is enough to put the entire oiling system out of commission. When new gaskets are needed, they should be replaced with "factory-made" gaskets.

8. Disassemble crankcases: Crankcases are held together with one cap screw, six studs with a nut on each end and one crankcase breather stud assembly. The cap screw enters through left case and threads into right case. Take out cap screw and remove nut from one end of each stud. Three of these studs, the one at top between cylinders and two at bottom are a tight fit and will have to be driven out with a drift of somewhat smaller diameter than studs. With all studs and screws removed, crankcases can be separated. If they don't come apart freely, tap at mounting lugs, using a block of wood and a hammer. Main bearing parts shown in Illus. 62 are now exposed.

9. Disassemble flywheels: Remove lock washer and nut from left end of crank pin. Tilt flywheel assembly on right flywheel and strike rim of left wheel with soft hammer about 90° away from pin. One or two sharp blows will usually loosen wheel. Do not strike wheel on its side, as doing so might either break flywheel or damage the tapered hole. With flywheels apart, connecting rods and roller bearing assembly can be removed from crank pin. Note that female (forked) rod is for the rear cylinder and male (single end) rod is for the front cylinder.

In connection with a complete overhaul, where all main bearings as well as connecting rod lower bearings are to be refitted, remove all shafts from flywheels. When crank pin is removed from right flywheel, it will be noted that this end of pin is a taper fit in flywheel, the same as the other end, but in addition is keyed. The purpose of this key is to locate the drilled oil passage in crank pin so that when wheels are assembled it will register exactly with drilled oil passage in right flywheel.

Disassembling Side Valve Engine

(After Removing From Chassis Completely Assembled)

1. Remove upper end parts as outlined under "Disassembling Engine for Top Overhaul Only" (Side Valve Engine), Page 40.

2. Remove pistons. See "Piston and Pin," Page 88.

3. Remove generator as outlined under "Removing Generator," Page 97.

4. Remove oil feed pump: Oil pump is secured by one hexagon-head screw and three nuts. Two of the nuts are extra long to provide wrench clearance and their location should be noted so they will be put back where they belong. After removing screw and nuts, pump can be pulled off (see Illus. 21).

Unless a new gasket is available, be very careful not to damage or break the old one. This is a special gasket as concerns both thickness and holes for oil passages. It is not advisable to replace it with a "home-made" gasket. Leaving out a hole or getting one in the wrong location is enough to put the entire oiling system out of commission. When a new gasket is needed, it should be replaced with a "factory-made" gasket.

5. Remove circuit breaker assembly from timing gear case cover: See Illus. 68. If low tension wire is shielded, disconnect metallic shielding from oil feed pump stud. Remove circuit breaker cover and unlatch cover retainer ends from holes in circuit breaker head. Head and also head seating tension (ground) spring underneath base are now free and head can be lifted off, exposing two screws that secure base to gear case cover. After removing these screws and lock washers, base with shaft and drive gear can be lifted out of cover. Be careful not to damage base gasket if new one is not available.

6. Remove gear case cover: Take out all remaining timing gear case cover screws and cover is then free to be removed. Cover is located on dowel pins which fit rather snugly and it must be worked off these pins carefully to avoid damage to cover and- joint faces. Do not pry off with screwdriver inserted between joint faces. Use a hammer and a block of wood and tap lightly at the ends where the cover projects beyond the gear case.

CAUTION: The thin steel shim washers assembled on outer ends of front cylinder cam gears may come off with the cover.

Sometimes one or more cam gears may come off with cover and if so, be careful that the thin steel shim washers on cam gear shafts are not lost, and also observe number and location of shims.

Unless a new gasket is available, be very careful not to damage or break the old one as this gasket, like the oil feed pump gasket is special as concerns both thickness and holes for oil passages. It should be replaced with a "factory-made" gasket.

7. Remove scavenger pump and crankcase breather valve: Scavenger pump is secured underneath gear case with four studs and nuts. Remove nuts and pump can then be pulled off the studs.

Breather valve is an integral part of scavenger pump. Screen between breather valve and crankcase port is free to come out when pump is removed.

8. Remove timing gears: After removing lock ring and washer from gear stud, gears and pinion shaft fittings can be removed (see Illus. 32). Be careful that the thin steel shim washers on cam gear shafts are not lost, and also observe number and location of shims.

9. Disassemble crankcases: Crankcases are held together with two cap screws, and five studs with a nut on each end. The two cap screws enter through the left case and thread into right

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