Zr550 Torque Setting For Cylinder Head

Caution: Once you start to remove the tensioner bolts, you must remove the

9.24a Apply sealant to the areas shown (arrowed)...

9.24b ... then fit the cover using a new gasket

9.26 Unscrew the cap bolt and withdraw the spring and stopper

9.24b ... then fit the cover using a new gasket tensioner all the way and reset it before tightening the bolts. The tensioner extends itself and locks in place, so if you loosen the bolts partway and then retighten them, the tensioner or cam chain will be damaged. Do not rotate the crankshaft once the tensioner has been removed. Removal

25 Remove the starter motor (see Chapter 8).

9.26 Unscrew the cap bolt and withdraw the spring and stopper

26 Unscrew the tensioner cap bolt from the side of the tensioner body and withdraw the stopper spring and stopper (see illustration).

27 Unscrew the two tensioner mounting bolts and withdraw the tensioner from the back of the cylinder block (see illustration 9.33).

28 Remove the gasket from the base of the tensioner or from the cylinder block and discard it as a new one must be used.

Inspection

29 Keeping your thumb on the plunger to prevent it from springing out, unscrew the plunger bolt from the side of the tensioner body (see illustration). Remove the bolt and release the plunger, then remove it along with the plunger spring. Check that the plunger moves freely in and out of the tensioner body. If it does not, clean all components with solvent and apply molybdenum disulphide grease to all moving parts.

30 Examine the tensioner components for signs of wear or damage (see illustration).

31 If the tensioner or any of its components are worn or damaged, or if the plunger is seized in the body, they must be replaced. Individual components are available.

Installation

32 Install the plunger spring and plunger into the tensioner, aligning the slot in the plunger with the plunger bolt hole (see illustration). Press the plunger into the tensioner and install the plunger bolt and its washer, making sure the bolt end locates in the slot in the plunger (see illustration 9.29). Tighten the bolt to the torque setting specified at the beginning of the Chapter.

33 Place a new gasket on the tensioner body, then install the tensioner, making sure the longer bolt is installed uppermost and with its aluminium washer (see illustration). Tighten the mounting bolts gradually and evenly to the torque setting specified at the beginning of the Chapter.

34 Install the stopper into the tensioner with its tapered face up, making sure it fits against the tapered face of the plunger (see illustration 9.26). The end of the stopper should protrude about 10 mm from the tensioner. If the stopper sticks out too far the tension has not been taken up by the plunger. If this is the case, remove the pulse generator assembly cover and turn the crankshaft clockwise using a 17 mm socket on the timing rotor hex (see illustration 11,2a and b).

Caution: DO NOT use the timing rotor bolt to turn the crankshaft - it may snap or strip out. Also be sure to turn the engine in its normal direction of rotation.

Set the rotor so that the T mark aligns with the static timing mark on the crankcase. If this does not cure the problem, remove the tensioner and check that it has been correctly assembled. With the stopper correctly installed, install the spring and cap bolt with its washer (see illustration 9.26). Tighten the cap bolt to the specified torque setting.

35 It is advisable to remove the valve cover (see Section 8) and check that the cam chain is tensioned and that the valve timing marks are all correctly aligned (see Section 11).

36 Apply a smear of sealant to the crankcase joints on the pulse generator assembly cover mating surface (see illustration 9.24a). Install the pulse generator assembly cover using a new gasket and tighten its bolts to the specified torque (see illustration 9.24b). If removed, install the valve cover (Section 8).

9.29 Remove the plunger bolt and release the plunger

Kawasaki Fh680v Head Bolt Torque

9.32 Align the slot in the plunger with the bolt hole (arrowed)

9.30 Tensioner components - 750 models

9.29 Remove the plunger bolt and release the plunger

9.32 Align the slot in the plunger with the bolt hole (arrowed)

9.33 Install the tensioner with the longer bolt and aluminium washer uppermost

10.3 Measure the cam chain as shown to determine stretch

10 Cam chain and blades -

removal, Inspection and * Installation gÇ

Note: To remove the cam chain the engine must be removed from the frame and the crankcases separated. The tensioner blade and guide blade can be removed with the engine in the frame.

Cam chain

Removal

1 Separate the crankcase halves (Section 24) and remove the crankshaft (see Section 27).

2 Slip the cam chain off the crankshaft. Inspection

3 Pull the chain tight to remove any slack, then measure the length of 21 pins (from the centre of the 1st pin to the centre of the 21st pin) and compare the result with the service limit specified at the beginning of the Chapter (see illustration). Take several measurements at different places in case the chain has worn unevenly. If any measurement exceeds the service limit, the chain must be replaced. If the chain is replaced, also replace the camshaft sprockets (see Section 11). The sprocket on the crankshaft should also be checked (see Section 27).

Installation

4 Slip the cam chain onto its sprocket on the crankshaft, making sure it is properly engaged.

5 Install the crankshaft (see Section 27).

Cam chain guide blade Removal

6 Remove the cylinder head (see Section 12).

7 Lift the blade out of the front of the cam chain tunnel in the cylinder block, noting which way round it fits and how it locates. Inspection

8 Examine the sliding surface of the guide for signs of wear or damage, and replace it if necessary.

Installation

9 Install the blade into the front of the cam chain tunnel in the cylinder block, making sure the sliding surface faces inwards and that it seats correctly in the cut-outs. On 550 models, install the blade sideways into the block and twist it round when it is in position (see illustration).

10 Install the cylinder head (see Section 12). Cam chain tensioner blade Removal

11 Remove the cylinder block (Section 15).

12 On 550 models, remove the two bolts securing the tensioner blade pivot bracket to the crankcase and remove the blade, noting which way round it fits. If required, push out the pivot pin and separate the blade and the bracket.

13 On 750 models, lift the cam chain tensioner blade out of its cut-outs in the crankcase, noting which way round it fits (see illustration 10.16). Take care not to lose the rubber dampers and pivot shaft which fits into the end of the blade.

Inspection

14 Examine the sliding surface of the tensioner blade for signs of wear or damage, and replace it if necessary. Check the condition of the pivot hardware and replace any components that are damaged or deteriorated.

Installation

15 On 550 models, If removed, install the bracket onto the end of the blade and slide the pin through to secure it. Install the blade onto the crankcase, making sure the sliding surface faces inwards, and tighten the bolts to

10.16 Fit the tensioner blade into the crankcase as shown

10.9 Fit the guide blade into the tunnel sideways and twist it round the torque setting specified at the beginning of the Chapter.

16 On 750 models, if removed, install the pivot shaft into the blade so that the flat ends face up. Fit the rubber dampers with the UP mark facing up onto the flat ends and secure them with some adhesive. Install the blade into the crankcase, making sure the sliding surface faces inwards and the shaft ends locate in their cut-outs (see illustration).

17 Install the cylinder block (see Section 15).

11 Camshafts and followers -

removal, inspection and installation

Note: The camshafts and followers can be removed with the engine in the frame.

Removal

1 Remove the valve cover (see Section 8).

2 Unscrew the bolts securing the pulse generator coil cover to the right-hand side of the engine (see illustration). The engine can be rotated by using a 17 mm socket on the timing rotor hex and turning it in a clockwise direction only (see illustration).

Caution: DO NOT use the timing rotor bolt to turn the crankshaft - it may snap or strip out. Also be sure to turn the engine in its normal direction of rotation. Alternatively, place the motorcycle on its centre stand (where fitted) or support it using an auxiliary stand so that the rear wheel is off the ground, then select a high gear and rotate the rear wheel by hand in its normal

11.2a The pulse generator assembly cover is secured by two bolts (arrowed)

Zzr1100 Timing Index

11.2b Rotate the engine using a 17 mm socket 11.2c Align the mark next to the T with the index mark (arrowed)

on the timing rotor hex

11.4 Note the number on each cap (A) and the corresponding number on the cylinder head (B). Arrow on each cap faces forward

11.8a Remove the follower

11.8b ... and the shim from each valve

11.9 Check the journal surfaces of the camshaft for scratches or wear

11.2b Rotate the engine using a 17 mm socket 11.2c Align the mark next to the T with the index mark (arrowed)

on the timing rotor hex direction of rotation. Rotate the engine until the T mark on the rotor is aligned with the static timing mark on the crankcase (see illustration), and so that the Z5EX mark (550 models) or Z7EX mark (750 models) on the exhaust camshaft sprocket points at the valve cover gasket mating surface on the front of the cylinder head (see illustrations 11.24a and b). Check the positions of all the marks on the exhaust and intake sprockets. This is how they should be positioned for installation later. On 550 models, as the camshafts are identical, make an EX mark on the exhaust camshaft and an IN mark on the intake camshaft (or use tags or labels) so they can be readily identified for installation. On 750 models, the exhaust camshaft has a raised section to the right of the sprocket mounting flange. It is essential the shafts do not get mixed up.

3 Remove the cam chain tensioner (see Section 9).

4 Before disturbing the camshaft caps, check for the identification number on each cap which corresponds to the number marked close to it on the cylinder head (see illustration). Also note the arrow on each cap which points to the front of the engine. These markings ensure that the caps can be matched up to their original journals on installation. If no markings are visible, mark your own using a suitable felt pen. If necessary, make a sketch of the layout as an aid for installation.

5 Unscrew the cap bolts for one of the camshafts, evenly and a little at a time and in a reverse of the tightening sequence (see illustration 11.26b), until they are all loose, then unscrew the cap bolts for the other camshaft. Remove the bolts and lift off the camshaft caps. Retrieve the dowels from either the cap or the cylinder head if they are loose (see illustration 11.26a).

Caution: If the bearing cap bolts aren't loosened evenly, the camshaft may bind.

6 Pull up on the cam chain and carefully guide one camshaft out. With the chain still held taut, remove the other camshaft.

7 While the camshafts are out, don't allow the chain to go slack - the chain may drop down and bind between the crankshaft and case, which could damage these components. Wire the chain to another component to prevent it from dropping. Also, cover the top of the cylinder head with a rag to prevent foreign objects from falling into the engine.

8 Obtain a container which is divided into eight compartments, and label each compartment with the location of its

11.4 Note the number on each cap (A) and the corresponding number on the cylinder head (B). Arrow on each cap faces forward

11.8b ... and the shim from each valve corresponding valve in the cylinder head and whether it belongs with an intake or an exhaust valve. Pick each follower and shim out of the cylinder head and store them in the corresponding compartment in the container (see illustrations).

Inspection

9 Inspect the bearing surfaces of the head and the bearing caps and the corresponding journals on the camshaft. Look for score marks, deep scratches or for any evidence of spalling (a pitted appearance) (see illustration).

11.9 Check the journal surfaces of the camshaft for scratches or wear

11.8a Remove the follower

11.10a Check the lobes of the camshaft for wear - here's an 11.10b Measure the height of the camshaft lobes example of damage requiring camshaft repair or renewal with a micrometer

11.11 Camshaft runout measurement

11.16a Compare the width of the crushed Plastigauge to the scale provided with it to obtain the clearance

11.13 Place a strip of Plastigauge on each bearing journal

11.16b Measure the cam bearing journal with a micrometer

11.10a Check the lobes of the camshaft for wear - here's an 11.10b Measure the height of the camshaft lobes example of damage requiring camshaft repair or renewal with a micrometer

11.16a Compare the width of the crushed Plastigauge to the scale provided with it to obtain the clearance

11.16b Measure the cam bearing journal with a micrometer and the intake camshaft is on the intake side of the engine. Engage the cam chain with the sprockets as you position the camshafts, so they don't turn as the bearing caps are tightened.

13 Cut eight strips of Plastigauge and lay one piece on each bearing journal, parallel with the camshaft centreline (see illustration).

14 Make sure the camshaft cap dowels are installed (see illustration 11.26a). Install the caps in their correct numbered positions and with the arrow on each cap pointing to the front of the engine (see illustration 11.4) and install the bolts. Tighten the bolts evenly and a little at a time in the sequence shown, to the torque listed in this Chapter's Specifications (see illustration 11.26b). While doing this, DO NOT let the camshafts rotate!

15 Now unscrew the bolts, a little at a time, and carefully lift off the caps.

16 To determine the oil clearance, compare the crushed Plastigauge (at its widest point) on each journal to the scale printed on the Plastigauge container (see illustration). Compare the results to this Chapter's Specifications. If the oil clearance is greater than specified, measure the diameter of the cam bearing journal with a micrometer (see illustration). If the journal diameter is less

10 Check the camshaft lobes for heat discoloration (blue appearance), score marks, chipped areas, flat spots and spalling (see illustration). Measure the height of each lobe with a micrometer (see illustration) and compare the results to the minimum lobe height listed in this Chapter's Specifications. If damage is noted or wear is excessive, the camshaft must be replaced.

11 The sprocket must be removed before camshaft runout can be checked. Check the sprocket markings in relation to the sprocket holding bolts before removing the bolts and separating the sprocket from the camshaft (see illustration 11.21a or b). Support each end of the camshaft on V-blocks, and measure any runout using a dial gauge positioned with its tip against the sprocket mounting shoulder (see illustration). If the runout exceeds the specified limit the camshaft must be replaced. Install the sprocket on the camshaft as described in Step 21.

12 Next, check the camshaft bearing oil clearances. Clean the camshafts, the bearing surfaces in the cylinder head and the bearing caps with a clean, lint-free cloth, then lay the camshafts in their correct place in the cylinder head, with the sprocket bolt heads facing the right-hand side of the engine and with the marks correctly aligned (see illustration 11.24a and b). Make sure the exhaust camshaft is on the exhaust side of the engine,

11.11 Camshaft runout measurement

11.13 Place a strip of Plastigauge on each bearing journal than the specified limit, replace the camshaft with a new one and recheck the clearance. If the clearance is still too great, or if the journal diameter was within limits, replace the cylinder head and camshaft caps with new parts.

17 Except in cases of oil starvation, the cam chain wears very little. If the chain has stretched beyond its limit (see Section 10), which makes it difficult to maintain proper tension, replace it with a new one.

18 Check the sprockets for wear, cracks and other damage, replacing them if necessary. If the sprockets are worn, the chain is also worn, and also the sprocket on the crankshaft (which can only be remedied by replacing the crankshaft). If wear this severe is apparent, the entire engine should be disassembled for inspection.

19 Inspect the outer surfaces of the cam followers for evidence of scoring or other damage. If a follower is in poor condition, it is probable that the bore in which it works is also damaged. Check for clearance between the followers and their bores. Whilst no specifications are given, if slack is excessive, replace the followers. If the bores are seriously out-of-round or tapered, the cylinder head and the followers must be replaced.

11.21a Sprocket details - 550 models

1 Bolt holes for intake camshaft

2 Bolt holes for exhaust camshaft

Installation

20 Lubricate each shim and its follower with engine oil and install them in the cylinder head, noting that the shim must be installed with its size marking downwards (see illustrations 11.8b and a). Note: It is most important that the shims and followers are returned to their original valves otherwise the valve clearances will be inaccurate.

21 If removed, install each sprocket onto Its camshaft. The sprockets are identical and can be interchanged, but are installed using different mounting holes (see illustrations). Be sure to correctly identify each camshaft (see Step 2), then install the sprockets accordingly. Make sure they are installed correctly and with the marked side of each sprocket facing out otherwise the timing marks will not align. Apply a smear of a suitable non-permanent thread locking compound to the sprocket bolts, then install them and tighten them to the torque setting specified at the beginning of the Chapter.

22 Make sure the bearing surfaces in the cylinder head and the camshaft caps are clean, then apply a light coat of engine assembly lube or moly-based grease to each of them. Apply a coat of moly-based grease to the camshaft lobes.

1 Bolt holes for intake camshaft

2 Bolt holes for exhaust camshaft

23 Check that the cam chain is engaged around the lower sprocket teeth on the crankshaft and that the crankshaft is positioned as described in Step 2. Next identify which is the exhaust camshaft and which is the intake (see Step 2). Install the exhaust camshaft through the cam chain. Position it so that the Z5EX mark (550 models) or Z7EX mark (750 models) on the sprocket points forwards and is flush with the top of the cylinder head mating surface (see illustrations 11.24a and b). Keeping the front run of the chain taut engage the chain on the sprocket teeth.

24 Starting with the cam chain pin that is directly opposite the Z5EX mark (550 models) and slightly above the Z7EX mark (750 models) on the exhaust camshaft sprocket, count the specified number of pins along the chain towards the intake side (see illustrations). Install the intake camshaft through the cam chain and engage the sprocket with the chain so that the Z5IN mark (550 models) or IN mark (750 models) on the sprocket aligns with the specified pins as shown.

25 Before proceeding further, check that everything aligns as described in Steps 2, 23

Before replacing camshafts

^tor the cylinder head and caps because of damage, check with local machine shops specialising in motorcycle engine work. In the case of the camshafts, it may be possible for cam lobes to be welded, re-ground and hardened, at a cost far lower than that of a new camshaft. If the bearing surfaces in the cylinder head are damaged, it may be possible for them to be bored out to accept bearing inserts. Due to the cost of a new cylinder head it is recommended that all options be explored before condemning it as trash!

Kawasaki R500 Camshaft Timing

11.24a Camshaft timing details - 550 models

1 Z5IN mark

2 Sprocket bolts (intake)

3 Intake camshaft sprocket

4 Cam chain

5 Cylinder head gasket surface

6 Exhaust camshaft sprocket

7 Sprocket bolts (exhaust)

8 Z5 EX mark

9 Pull this side of the chain taut

Kawasaki Fh680v Head Bolt Torque

Front

11.26a Check that the camshaft cap dowels are installed

11.26b Camshaft cap bolt tightening sequence

550 Camshaft Tightening Sequence

11.26c Tighten the bolts to the specified torque setting

11.24b Camshaft timing details - 750 models

1 IN mark

2 Sprocket bolts (intake)

3 Intake camshaft sprocket

4 Cam chain

5 Cylinder head gasket surface

6 Exhaust camshaft sprocket

7 Sprocket bolts (exhaust)

8 Z7EX mark

9 Pull this side of the chain taut

Front

11.26a Check that the camshaft cap dowels are installed

11.26b Camshaft cap bolt tightening sequence and 24. If it doesn't, the valve timing will be inaccurate and the valves will contact the pistons when the engine is turned over.

26 Oil the camshaft caps. Ensure the camshaft cap dowels are installed (see illustration), then fit the caps, making sure they are in their proper positions as noted on removal (Step 4) (see illustration 11.4). Tighten the cap bolts on one camshaft evenly and a little at a time in the sequence shown, until the specified torque setting is reached (see illustrations). Repeat for the other camshaft. Note: The cap bolts are of the high tensile type - don't use any other type of bolt.

27 With all caps tightened down, check that the valve timing marks still align (see Steps 2, 23 and 24). Check that each camshaft is not pinched by turning the crankshaft a few degrees in each direction with a 17 mm socket on the timing rotor hex (see

Caution: If the marks are not aligned exactly as described, the valve timing will be incorrect and the valves may strike the pistons, causing extensive damage to the

28 Install the cam chain tensioner (see

29 Check the valve clearances (see Chapter 1).

30 The remainder of installation is the reverse of removal Apply a smear of sealant to the crankcase joints on the pulse generator assembly cover mating surface (see illustration 9.24a). Install the pulse generator assembly cover using a new gasket and tighten its bolts to the specified torque setting (see illustration 9.24b). Install the valve cover

12 Cylinder head - ^

removal and installation ^

Caution: The engine must be completely cool before beginning this procedure or the cylinder head may become warped. Note: The cylinder head can be removed with the engine in the frame. If the engine has already been removed, ignore the steps which

Removal

1 Remove the carburettors (see Chapter 3).

12.5a Remove the cylinder head front bolts (A) and cylinder block nut (B)...

11.26c Tighten the bolts to the specified torque setting

2 Remove the exhaust system (see Chapter 3).

3 Remove the spark plugs (see Chapter 1).

4 Remove the camshafts (see Section 11).

5 On 550 models, the cylinder head is secured by twelve 8 mm domed nuts with plain washers and five 6 mm bolts, and the cylinder block by three 6 mm nuts. Unscrew the bolts and nuts on the front and back of the cylinder head and block (see illustrations). The twelve domed nuts are numbered for identification (see illustration). Slacken the nuts evenly and a little at a time in a reverse of their numerical sequence until they are all slack. Remove all the nuts and their washers, taking great care not to drop any of them into

6 On 750 models, the cylinder head is secured by twelve 10 mm domed nuts with plain washers and two 8 mm bolts, which are

12.5b ... and the cylinder head rear bolts (A) and cylinder block nuts (B)

located inside the cam chain tunnel. The nuts and bolts are numbered for identification (see illustration). Slacken them evenly and a little at a time in a reverse of their numerical sequence until they are all slack. Remove all the nuts and their washers, and the bolts, taking great care not to drop any of them into the crankcase.

7 Pull the cylinder head up off the studs. If it is stuck, tap around the joint faces of the cylinder head with a soft-faced mallet to free the head. Do not attempt to free the head by inserting a screwdriver between the head and cylinder block - you'll damage the sealing surfaces.

8 Lift the head off the block, passing the cam

12.9 Remove the dowel (arrowed) from each front outer stud if it is loose
12.13b ... and fit a new O-ring around it

chain down through the tunnel as you do. Do not let the chain fall into the block - secure it with a piece of wire or metal bar to prevent it from doing so. Remove the old cylinder head gasket and the two oil nozzles and the O-rings which fit around them on each end of the block. Stuff a clean rag into the cam chain tunnel to prevent any debris falling into the engine. Discard the gasket and O-rings as new ones must be used.

9 If they are loose, remove the dowels from around the front outer studs (see illustration). If either appears to be missing it is probably stuck in the underside of the cylinder head.

10 Check the cylinder head gasket and the mating surfaces on the cylinder head and

12.13a Press each oil nozzle into its hole ...
12.15 Keep the cam chain taut when fitting the cylinder head

block for signs of leakage, which could Indicate warpage. Refer to Section 14 and check the flatness of the cylinder head.

11 Clean all traces of old gasket material from the cylinder head and block. If a scraper is used, take care not to scratch or gouge the soft aluminium. Be careful not to let any of the gasket material fall into the crankcase, the cylinder bores or the oil passages.

Installation

12 If removed, install the two dowels onto the front outer studs on the cylinder block (see illustration 12.9). Lubricate the cylinder bores with engine oil.

13 Make sure the oil nozzles are clean and not blocked, then install them into each end of the cylinder block (see illustration). Fit new O-rings around them (see illustration). Make sure they are pressed into their recesses and are properly seated.

14 Ensure both cylinder head and block mating surfaces are clean, then lay the new head gasket in place on the cylinder block, making sure all the holes are correctly aligned and that the UP or HEAD letters on the gasket face up. Never re-use the old gasket.

15 Carefully lower the cylinder head over the studs and onto the block (see illustration). It is helpful to have an assistant to pass the cam chain up through the tunnel and slip a piece of wire through it to prevent it falling back into the engine. Keep the chain taut to prevent it becoming disengaged from the crankshaft sprocket.

16 On 550 models, install the twelve 10 mm domed nuts with their plain washers and tighten them finger-tight. Now tighten the nuts evenly and a little at a time in their numerical sequence (see illustration 12.5c) to the torque setting specified at the beginning of the Chapter (see illustration). When the nuts are correctly torqued, tighten the bolts at the front and back of the cylinder head and the nuts at the front and back of the cylinder block to the specified torque setting (see illustration 12.5a and b).

Kawasaki Fh680v Head Bolt Torque
12.16 Tighten the cylinder head nuts in the correct sequence to the specified torque

17 On 750 models, install the twelve 10 mm domed nuts with their plain washers, and the two 8 mm bolts and tighten them finger-tight. Now tighten the nuts and bolts evenly and a little at a time in their numerical sequence (see illustration 12.6) to the torque settings specified at the beginning of the Chapter (see illustration 12.16).

18 Install the camshafts (see Section 11) and the valve cover (see Section 8).

19 Install the spark plugs (see Chapter 1).

20 Install the exhaust system (see Chapter 3).

21 Install the carburettors (see Chapter 3).

DIY Battery Repair

DIY Battery Repair

You can now recondition your old batteries at home and bring them back to 100 percent of their working condition. This guide will enable you to revive All NiCd batteries regardless of brand and battery volt. It will give you the required information on how to re-energize and revive your NiCd batteries through the RVD process, charging method and charging guidelines.

Get My Free Ebook


Responses

  • Mary
    How to check cam chain for wear?
    2 years ago
  • Wilimar
    How to do timing on kawasaki zzr1100?
    2 years ago

Post a comment