Acknowledgements

My brother once told me to sell my VeL : r >: rambler and ride on the roac. I followed his advice, narrowed my choice down to a twin-c> bree?.: jur-stroke and looked for the best deal. Back in early 1974, Roger Slater saw to it that I bo ; - _ erda by being the only motorcycle dealer to answer my request for machine details anc prices through the post. I must thank them both. George Magnus rode in my car when I went :: Hereirrdshire to collect my first machine, to drive the car back. He goaded me on.

From then on the problems arose bet _ s:;yed the course of ownership with no little thanks to, and in no special order, Geoff Fad; >f: Hew and Dave Minton. Writing help came from all at Slater Brothers, Geoff Streeter. Hal Kendall and Gareth Jones of the International Laverda Owners Club, and :: course, Hans Blomcvi?: ' :::: Laverda's ex-PRO, who at the time of writing provided answers to my every request. He.r came from Robert Bosch GmbH, Smiths Industries Ltd., Imperial Metal Industries (Arr.-. Marine and Diesel Co. Ltd. (Fiamm), Motorrad,

Tuttomo:: and Ken Blake of He\¿? -I Photographic and drawing help from the lens and pencils of Ulrich Schwab. - ...dims, Motor Cycle Week;. Moto Laverda SpA,

Ampersand and production help from /Lex Rollo, John Burnand and Doug Kenyon of Graffiti. My wife Mane , typed it all. Thank yot

1 It is unknot - . : - f :<; prototype this is except that the da'- "Sf ~ :: •: suspiciously like the one which Carle : ?:: rec f a 1967 issue of the

American fMk0BZM0 C^pciv IWoftd. In fact, it is not far away from t~-z$t ' *r zrzzjctfon 650s

1 It is unknot - . : - f :<; prototype this is except that the da'- "Sf ~ :: •: suspiciously like the one which Carle : ?:: rec f a 1967 issue of the

American fMk0BZM0 C^pciv IWoftd. In fact, it is not far away from t~-z$t ' *r zrzzjctfon 650s

A well knom - p-z'zenz' .:/a 1968 750GT - it's actually to A**eriae-" taunte: specification, something often misse-z zsg.es came later. Note the early tank badge ran* filler cap, near oval shape of the dutch cabtm access orifice and twin cable throttle contro-

3 Photo-journ sr-res: ■ :?r Richard Renstrom road tested this Ame*- ;ai tag e 750GT for a motoring magazine r "e . ~ s-r States. This machine has the standard taSo" .». — :ie Eagle' badge, high, braced handlebars a~z _ - _ 5.5 g.'/ps, and American specifica: jn'ea~ g~~ Ainoever assembled the machine frorr fe crate put the front mudguard on back-to-front ana * II have caused speedometer cable failure pretty soon!

Definitions

For the purposes of the following specifications the machines are defined as follows. The 650 Twin, although first presented at the Earls Court Show of 1966. was produced from mid-1968 to the year end only, as a touring type of machine with the r.cst "aasic" specification which altered little. The 750GT, produced from May 1968 alor.,-. c- tr.e 650. v. — very much a pioneer sports-touring machine which changed little in its genera, specification curing production.

The 750S produced from early 196 ? \-.r: _g.it to late 197C v. - - the first really sporting machine; its specification did alter as it merged u;:: re earliest 7505F That SF was superceded in late 1972. Remember the Laverda model • - a r m ate July of each > ear. to be started again in late August, after the factory holiday. I. - re possible to grc_c the ~50S with the early SF.

The 750SF of late 1972 through tc ear . -~~ went through various changes of specification although the engine remained pretty s: e 7":.e earliest 'second generation SF' had a drum brake up front which changed to single or due. i-c u i:e 1973. The last tr.odei c: SF featured triple discs and cast wheels and first saw the light : -. r. late 1975/eariy 19":

Remember that the designation SF: - -1 - c J SF3 has nothing whacscever o do with how many disc brakes the machine is fitted with. Tae SF was the SF, the sec~er.es as just described was the SF1: the SF2 had either one or : -:¡at discs; the last, cast wr.ee. . ersion was the SF3.

The wee- : Motor Cycle's 1970 road test 750S nence 'trade plates'). This is the machine which so impresses ~ -. ournalists particularly Dave htinton Remember that 1970 had only just witnessed the Honda 750 and the B - vsh •ndustry, at least, were ree ng from the shock. Handsome is as handsome does

The 750GTL used the last SF frame of 1974 but with a drum front brake and different 'touring' components, including a 'soft' engine.

The GTL is the machine used by many police forces throughout the world but particularly by the polizia urbane in Italy. Some of these machines used an alternator instead of a dynamo but with no particular advantage, and some, in the Middle East, even had the full SF engine.

s with CEV headlamp, filtered carburettors (36mm PHFl Lucas switchgear and the big balance

»t »ust system. The paintwork on this machine is almost certain to tie metallic, perhaps a deep blue

The first 750SF - r- s instruments, unfiltereo lockable hump seat see~ i

~f :- i '972 version. Now it has Laverda tn*bs mfmmum «etlars, and this particular machine has tfmiac§m(g%m fame suffered from something...

SF2, 1974, metallic black, factory carrier, fact: -< the cross-over exhaust balance box, nearly ne « Hereford registration code

-¿-S dual seat and judging by the chrome still visible on 5 first 750 two days after he had bought it. RCJ is a

750GTs like this one were made from 1971 through to 1973. You can see that much of its equipment does differ from its contemporaries, the S and then SF. Ignore the panniers and the mirrors, they were extras. The h I s appearance, perhaps, belies the way it performs

The GTL used a sm. s j: --e SF and most of its mechanics p*-?s "'-» : : ■■fences are those of non-mechanical equipmmm - ¡mote the rear hand-rail, fork gaiters, seai, smfc famrik ■ami tank, and handlebars This machine has the e* t• ~ s 200mm Bosch headlamp soon r: . - - ■ -<? 180mm

P®«2» L ttmme - many of these blue, and often red, machines are still to be found on point duty in Italian towns am* c-'es and many other countries too). The soft' engine of the GTL was ideal for Police use and their isf^empemnental handling must have added to their success

Late 1975 saw the SF2 become the SF3, as -«rs Cast alloy wheels, rear disc brake and the tail fairing distinguish the SF3. Small but nevertheless brackets on the frame make it very difficult to convert an SF2 into a 3. Some SF3s used the ear er seee'-T iteration tank badge presumably to use up stock

Late 1975 saw the SF2 become the SF3, as -«rs Cast alloy wheels, rear disc brake and the tail fairing distinguish the SF3. Small but nevertheless brackets on the frame make it very difficult to convert an SF2 into a 3. Some SF3s used the ear er seee'-T iteration tank badge presumably to use up stock

The SFC was not a modified 7505 or 750SF if anything it was the other way around. The first SFCs were factory experimental bikes used far racing. After their successes on the race track, the factory built some replicas for genera. sa_e [1971 - 1976). Many of the SFC features were eventually incorporated in the standar o SF range. SFC tuning modifications were available too, from the factory.

Few SFCs were exported. The Ubiteri States probably took the most — two deliveries of fifty each in 1974 for example. Cast whee^ec SFCs are very, very rare. onl. :nree being recorded in Britain. One important feature, often nnssed on the SFC, is that they never had drum and disc brakes mixed — it was two drums or three discs. Late SFCs ha d LT electronic ignition fed by the battery.

The first production 1000 Triple appeared j 1973 with a arum front brake. This was soon changed for a pair of discs. These first macn-nes were i Jiiply known as the '1000'. The disc-braked. wire-wheeled versions were 1 i«00-3Cs The 3QE) was a high performance version for the UK market featuring factory components i'excer • -•.-• but fitted in the UK. The 1000-3CL was the next standard machine with triple discs anc : ast >■ .oeels. The Jota was a high performance 3CL built at the factory (except exhaust) for the LT. The American version of the 3CL was called the Jarama (it is not a Jota!). Some Jaramas were —ported into Britain in early 1979 (ten were later made into Jotas!).

The 1200 was not strictly an over-bored 1000, a lot of the components not being interchangeable. It was conceived as a touring machine. The American version was called the Jota America, — (it's confusing). Mid-1978, a few months after the announcement of the first 1200, saw the 1200 Mirage hit the UK market. It's a factory model with more performance (effectively Jota cams and exhaust but no high compression pistons). The 1200 featured a slightly different frame from that of the 1000, having angled rear shocks. Very late 1978 saw 1200 framed 1000s being made. 1979 was the year of the silver framed 1000s. The Jota had an orange tank and single seat option with black exhaust while a limited edition Anniversary 1200 used a gold frame and black everything else.

Not all SFCs were produced with orange paint - this 1972 version is obviously of a darker hue. This early model shows just how close it was possible to manufacture a racing motorcyle and then to make it legal for road use. Note the Amal carburettors

Trump Chopper 650 750

Photographed at a race meeting, but not itself racing on this occasion, this 1975 SFC appears to be hard used. Compare this machine with the earlier SFC and note the headlamp and fairing, footrest, exhaust, side panel and tank. This time it was painted orange

A three-cylinder twin - one of the Triple pr: -; -.,: sack in 1969. Moto Laverda obviously had to try a single-overhead camshaft modelled along Twin lire; -; r with. It has a similar relationship to that which exists between the Triumph Bonneville and Trider- »era decided it wasn't worthy of more development. It is not clear whether it was this actual machine : - -¿i • 120° crankshaft, which was then converted to 180°. This machine still exists

An early drum braked 1000 3C in 1973. Note 200mm headlamp, Lucas switch gear and flasher units, polished fork yokes and lack of oil cooler

Trump Chopper 650 750

TNDSswitch nJ^r rffJ^Tl - : 0 Sa/6S p'0™0!ion machine- " has an oil cooler, revised horn mounting, nu switch gear, disc t x*es . course, and the 'square' tail lamp. Where are the flasher units?

and tail fTi^nnnthofIiiJL°f 1*® 3CLs' Ap?rt ,rom the alloy wheels <of course' sti" the thin-webbed versions) frame bSc,ZtryfSnhT^ disl"9^ countings, oil cooler shape, instrument mounting and rear

TNDSswitch nJ^r rffJ^Tl - : 0 Sa/6S p'0™0!ion machine- " has an oil cooler, revised horn mounting, nu switch gear, disc t x*es . course, and the 'square' tail lamp. Where are the flasher units?

When this book was written the 750 Twins were just off the market, although production probably ceased somewhat earlier. The machines have had a good run of ten years and with something around 19,000 units in total built. Some would say that they are one of the finest rratmnes ever to come from Italy, even the finest from Laverda; whatever one's opinion of their ; no-one can deny the pleasure they have brought many an owner. This book hopes to play its part in keeping as many of those 19,000 running.

The 1000 Triple has pushed Laverda to the top of the speed tree, 140 mph often being quoted for the Jota. Undoubtedly the 1200 will start to play its part too. What will become obvious to any user of this book is that all the big Laverdas are born of the same family, perhaps even of one single ¿eneration. It makes sense to cover the Twins and Triples in this one book. For instant proof to anyone with doubts, look at the bore and strokes of the 650, 750, 1000 and 1200! All Laverda Twins mported by McCormack International Corporation of California into the United States of America were known as American Eagles. Some used standard steel Laverda tanks, others used American built glass fibre ones. Of course, there were some other differences! Records show that the McCormack International Corporation received their last machines in July/August 1969 (40 off 750S, and 10 off 750GT).

It is perhaps pertinent to cover Laverda s Triple endurance racers here even though they are not covered in this guide. The factory have built only six although various dealers may have built their own. One was made for the 1972 Bol d'Or — this one was a standard machine with an SFC fairing. For the same race in 1974, the factory made one for the French Laverda importer. It was a more-or-less standard machine but with a iower rear-frame and full fairing. It was in 1975 that four machines were made, and it is these which are known as the Laverda '1000 Endurance racers'. They featured bigger valves, 36mm carburettors, 4-row primary chain, duplex rear chain, close ratio gearbox, alternator mounted in front of the engine and tubular space frame.

Trump Chopper 650 750

Laverda's 3CL went to North America as a Jarama. Some were supplied to the UK market, all of them being painted either red or green. Note the side reflectors, right side foot brake and black Ceriani fork legs

Laverda Jota Horn

For the author, the -: i-asome of all the Triples - the silver frame and orange paint of the 1979 Jota. 1979 saw many change; ---;-;.;5 - thick web alloy wheels; 1200-frame meaning relocated horns; angled rear shocks; grab rail a<-: ■ no lifting handle; Marzocchi front forks; black exhaust (note this Jota does not have Jota silencers ¿~: : - rnrer in the year a single hump seat and rear-set footrests

Front Fork Nomenclature

Behemoth, Laverda's 1200, although it is no bigger in physical size than the 3CL. This is an early 1200 of 1977/78. Note the lack of tank badge (sticker), Ceriani front forks, G TL type handlebars and angled but still Ceriani rear shocks. Subtly, each model using the tail fairing has its own seat fabric pattern

Finally some explanation of the nomenclature used by the factory is necessary. The first 750 » is -- touring machine hence GT, or Gran Turismo. 1969 saw the 750S, a much more sporting -tarh-nf — S is for Sport. When the 750S, fitted with Grimeca hubs, was fitted with Laverda hubs :«ame the SF - F for /reni or brakes — and hence is strictly the Sport Brakes. The 1973 SF featured so much new equipment that the factory added '1' to distinguish it, thus SFl. When disc r: ii.es came along for 1974 it became SF2 whether it had one front disc or two, and then SF3 when ¿amed cast wheels and a rear disc. The origin of GTL is unclear. No one at the factory can remember what the 'L' stands for — could it be Lusso, or luxury, by way of a free translation. SFC, of course, means SF Competizione.

The first Triple was the 1000 3C, standing for 3 Cylinder. The 3QE) was Slater designation — "E" for England? The 3CL denotes a 3C with Lega or alloy (wheels). It was Roger Slater who chose the name Jota. As a serious music lover he w as looking through a musical dictionary one evening and he came across a Spanish gipsy dance it. tnree-step. As soon as he saw the word he knew it was right for the Lega 3C(E). It is coinc. ce - :e that he chose a name already given to a one-off Lamborghini Muira competition version o ?~0. Remember how he used to advertise the early Twins as 'the Lamborghini of motorcycles P^srember that the American 5CL is called a Jarama (a racing circuit outside Madrid in Spain am tnat Lamborghini used this name for yet another of their production cars also in 1970. I know i: to be coincidence.

The Jota America is an American specification 1200. The Mirage is a committee decision name for the Slater specification, high pe :rmance 1200. Jota is pronounced oe-tah by English speakers although if one were Spanish it wol: be Ho-ta or Italian, Yo-ta.

1978 saw the Slater Brothers inspired Mirage - a 1200 with Jota camshafts and exhaust. Note the changes in equipment. This 1200 has tank badges, metallic green paint and yellow Mirage script, Marzocchi forks but still Ceriani rear shocks (not Corte e Cosso). This Mirage was a UK road test machine and its mirror was added for that purpose. The Slaters also marketed a special 25-machine run of 'VC' Mirages which featured a special paint scheme by Steve Finch

1978 saw the Slater Brothers inspired Mirage - a 1200 with Jota camshafts and exhaust. Note the changes in equipment. This 1200 has tank badges, metallic green paint and yellow Mirage script, Marzocchi forks but still Ceriani rear shocks (not Corte e Cosso). This Mirage was a UK road test machine and its mirror was added for that purpose. The Slaters also marketed a special 25-machine run of 'VC' Mirages which featured a special paint scheme by Steve Finch

Laverda Gold

Moto Laverda's celebra:--- sersary 1200 of 1979. This one is gold ate z s -nachine uses virtually no chrome much of wrat *a normally be chromed having been blac-e--~: : f k drilled discs, left foot gear shift, Lanfrancom s:a~z + : ; fencer and two hydraulic master cylinder :---; -¿meiebars. And there's that long awaited hydraulic dutc*

Moto Laverda's celebra:--- sersary 1200 of 1979. This one is gold ate z s -nachine uses virtually no chrome much of wrat *a normally be chromed having been blac-e--~: : f k drilled discs, left foot gear shift, Lanfrancom s:a~z + : ; fencer and two hydraulic master cylinder :---; -¿meiebars. And there's that long awaited hydraulic dutc*

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Responses

  • daniel
    Which fiamm horns were fitted to laverda 750 sf2?
    4 years ago

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