Tread Depth

Check local traffic regulations concerning minimum tread depth. Measure the tread depth at the center of tire and to the center of the tire tread (Figure 1) using a tread depth gauge or a small ruler. Suzuki recommends to replace original equipment tires when the front tire tread depth is 1.6 mm (1/16 in.) or less, when the rear tread depth is 2.0 mm (3/32

in.) or less, or when tread wear indicators appear at the designated area on the tire indicating the minimum tread depth.

Rim Inspection and Runout

Frequently inspect wheel rims or cracks, warpage or dents. A damaged rim may be sufficient to cause an air leak or knock it out of alignment.

Wheel rim runout is the amount of "wobble" a wheel shows as it rotates. You can check runout with the wheels on the bike by simply supporting the bike with the wheel off the ground. Slowly turn the wheel while you hold a pointer solidly against a fork leg or the swing arm with the other end against the wheel rim. Just be sure any wobble you observe isn't caused by your own hand.

NOTE

A more accurate method of measuring runout is described in Chapter Ten.

The maximum allowable runout with the tire installed on the rim is as follows:

BATTERY

The battery is an important component in the bike's electrical system, yet most electrical system problems can be traced to battery neglect. The battery should be cleaned and inspected at periodic intervals. All models are equipped with a maintenance free sealed batteiy and the electrolyte level cannot be checkcd.

On all models covered in this manual, the negative side is grounded. When removing the battery, disconnect the negative (-) cable first, then the positive (+) cable. This minimizes the chance of a tool shorting to ground when disconnecting the battery positive cable.

Negative Cable Disconnection (For Service Procedures Only)

1. Place the bike on the sidestand.

2. Remove the screw on each side and remove the battery cover (Figure 2).

3. On the right-hand side, remove the screw and disconnect the battery negative (-) lead.

4. Move the lead (A, Figure 3) out of the way so it will not accidentally contact the battery negative terminal (B, Figure 3).

5. Attach the black negative (-) cable. Tighten the bolt securely.

6. Coat the battery connection with dielectric grease or petroleum jelly to retard corrosion.

7. Install the battery cover (Figure 2) and the screw on each side. Tighten the screws securely.

Removal and Installation

1. Place the bike on the sidestand.

2. Remove the screw on each side and remove the battery cover (Figure 2).

3. On the right-hand side, remove the screw and disconnect the battery negative (-) lead (Figure 4).

4. On the left-hand side, remove the screw and disconnect the battery positive (+) lead (Figure 5).

5. Remove the bolt on one side (A, Figure 6) securing the battery case floor (B, Figure 6) in place.

6. Either hold the battery case floor or place wooden block(s) under it to support the floor when the other bolt is removed.

7. Remove the bolt (Figure 7) from the other side of the case.

8. Lower the battery case floor (A, Figure 8) and slide the battery (B, Figure 8) out of the case. Remove the battery.

9. Inspect the battery as described in this section.

10. Position the battery with the negative (-) battery terminal on the right-hand side of the frame.

11. Carefully move the battery (B, Figure 8) up into the batter}' case and hinge the case floor (A, Figure 8) up into position. Install one of the bolts (Figure 7) only finger tight at this time.

12. Install the bolt (A, Figure 6) on the other side, then tighten both bolts securely.

CAUTION Be sure the battery cables are connected to their proper terminals. Connecting the battery backwards will reverse the polarity and damage the rectifier.

13. Attach the red positive (+) cable and bolt (Figure 5), then the black negative (-) cable (Figure 4). Tighten the bolts securely.

14. Coat the battery connections with dielectric grease or petroleum jelly to retard corrosion.

15. Install the battery cover (Figure 2) and the screw on each side. Tighten the screws securely.

Inspection and Testing

The battery electrolyte level cannot be serviced. Never attempt to remove the sealing bar cap (A, Figure 9) from the top of the battery. This bar cap was installed and sealed after the initial filling of electrolyte, and must not to be removed thereafter.

The battery does not require periodic electrolyte inspection or water refilling.

WARNING Even though the battery is a sealed type, protect your eyes, skin and clothing when servicing it. Electrolyte is very corrosive and can cause severe chemical skin burns and permanent injury when spilled. The battery case may be cracked and leaking electrolyte. If any electrolyte is spilled or splashed on clothing or skin, immediately neutralize it with a solution of baking soda and water, then flush with an abundance of clean water. Electrolyte splashed into the eyes is extremely harmful. Safety glasses should always be worn while working with a battery. If you get electrolyte in your eyes, and force your eyes open and flood them with cool, clean water for approximately 15 minutes.

1. Remove the battery as described in this chapter.

2. Inspect the battery cover, case and floor surfaces for contamination or damage. Clean with a solution of baking soda and water.

3. Set the battery on a stack of newspapers or shop cloths to protect the surface of the workbench.

4. Check the battery case for cracks or other damage. If the battery case is warped, discolored or has a raised top, the battery has been suffering from overcharging or overheating.

5. Cheek the battery terminal bolts, spacers and nuts for corrosion or damage. Clean parts thoroughly with a solution of baking soda and water. Replace severely corroded or damaged parts.

6. If corroded, clean the top of the battery with a stiff bristle brush using the baking soda and water solution.

7. Check the battery cable clamps for corrosion and damage. If corrosion is minor, clean the battery cable clamps with a stiff wire brush. Replace severely worn or damaged cables.

8. Connect a voltmeter between the battery negative and positive leads (Figure 10). Note the following:

a. If the battery voltage is 13.0-13.2 volts (at 20° C [68° F), the battery is fully charged b. If the battery voltage is below 12.3 volts (at 20° C [68° F]), the battery is undercharged and requires charging.

c. If the battery voltage is less than 12.0 volts (at 20° C [68° F]), the battery is unserviceable and must be replaced. 9. If the battery is undercharged, recharge it as described in this chapter. Then test the charging system as described in Chapter Two.

DIY Battery Repair

DIY Battery Repair

You can now recondition your old batteries at home and bring them back to 100 percent of their working condition. This guide will enable you to revive All NiCd batteries regardless of brand and battery volt. It will give you the required information on how to re-energize and revive your NiCd batteries through the RVD process, charging method and charging guidelines.

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